The New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics

2018 Edition
| Editors: Macmillan Publishers Ltd

Chicago School (New Perspectives)

  • Ross B. Emmett
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-349-95189-5_2186

Abstract

M. W. Reder’s entry on the Chicago School closed with the claim that the final chapter of the School’s history was about to end. Chicago economics has changed, but it has also stayed the same. Each of the four movements of recent Chicago economics are rooted in common themes of the tradition. As well, our interpretation of economics at Chicago has evidenced both continuity and change. Historians are examining the history of the institutional structure of Chicago economics, as well as the histories of specific fields at Chicago (labour, economic history, quantitative analysis) and finding both change and continuity in the tradition.

Keywords

American Economic Association Becker, G Chicago model Chicago School Coase, R. H Cowles Commission Director, A Friedman, F Griliches, Z Hansen, L Harberger, A Heckman, J Johnson, D. G Johnson, H. G Knight, F Lange, O Levitt, S Lewis, H. G Lucas, R Markowitz, H Miller, M Mundell, R Murphy, K National Bureau of Economic research Positive economics Rees, A Sargent, T Schultz, G Schultz, T. W Stigler, G Viner, J 
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Copyright information

© Macmillan Publishers Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ross B. Emmett
    • 1
  1. 1.