The New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics

2018 Edition
| Editors: Macmillan Publishers Ltd

National Bureau of Economic Research

  • Malcolm Rutherford
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-349-95189-5_2073

Abstract

The National Bureau of Economic Research was founded in 1920 and has been regarded as one of the leading research organizations in economics ever since. This entry deals briefly with the founding of the NBER, its early research on national income and business cycles, its later research directions and contributions, and some of the more important changes in organization and direction that have occurred up to 2007.

Keywords

Burns, A. F. Business cycle measurement Commons, J. R. Cowles Commission Fabricant, S. Feldstein, M. Friedman, M. Gay, E. Kuznets, S. Meyer, J. Mitchell, W. C. Moore, G. National Bureau of Economic Research National income National income accounting Rorty, M. Schwartz, A. Stigler, G. Stone, N. I. 

JEL Classifications

B2 
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Bibliography

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Copyright information

© Macmillan Publishers Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Malcolm Rutherford
    • 1
  1. 1.