The New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics

2018 Edition
| Editors: Macmillan Publishers Ltd

Enlightenment, Scottish

  • John Robertson
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-349-95189-5_1674

Abstract

The Scottish contribution to the Europe-wide intellectual movement of Enlightenment in the 18th century was unusually rich, covering moral philosophy, history, and political economy. It was not the simple product of the Union with England in 1707; more important were the gradual opening up of intellectual life and reform of the country’s intellectual institutions, notably the universities, and economic growth, rapid by the last quarter of the century. The Scots set the investigation of economic phenomena in a broad framework; led by David Hume and Adam Smith, they were particularly interested in the comparative development prospects of rich and poor nations.

Keywords

Chalmers, T. Commercial society Division of labour Enlightenment Ferguson, A. Galiani, F. Genovesi, A. Hume, D. Hutcheson, F. Individual liberty Innovation Invisible hand Justice Kames, Lord Law, J. Luxury Mandeville, B. Melon, J.-F. Millar, J. Natural jurisprudence Physiocracy Political economy Private property Protectionism Pufendorf, S. Quesnay, F. Reid, T. Robertson, W. Rule of law Scottish Enlightenment Shaftesbury, Lord Smith, A. Specialization Stages theory of development Steuart, Sir J. Stewart, D. Subsistence Tableau économique 
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Copyright information

© Macmillan Publishers Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • John Robertson
    • 1
  1. 1.