The New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics

2018 Edition
| Editors: Macmillan Publishers Ltd

Spatial Economics

  • Gilles Duranton
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-349-95189-5_1647

Abstract

This article provides a general overview of spatial economics, which covers location theory, spatial competition, and regional and urban economics. After a brief review of the main theoretical traditions, the fundamental role of non-convexities and imperfect competition is highlighted. The main challenges faced by theoretical and empirical research are also discussed, followed by a broader discussion of the relationship between this field of research and other sub-fields of economics and other disciplines.

Keywords

Alonso, W. Debreu, G. Economic geography Hecksher–Ohlin trade theory Hotelling, H. Krugman, P. New economic geography Non-convexity Ricardo, D. Spatial economics Spatial impossibility theorem Systems of cities Thünen, J. von Urban agglomeration Weber, A. 
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Copyright information

© Macmillan Publishers Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gilles Duranton
    • 1
  1. 1.