The New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics

2018 Edition
| Editors: Macmillan Publishers Ltd

Philosophy and Economics

  • D. Wade Hands
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-349-95189-5_1622

Abstract

The literature on philosophy and economics has traditionally been divided into two areas: economic methodology, which connects economics and epistemology/philosophy of science, and the literature on economics and moral philosophy/ethics. Recent developments in both of these areas are discussed in detail.

Keywords

Altruism Bargaining Capabilities approach to social welfare Consumer choice theory Critical realist research programme Economics of scientific knowledge Empirical macroeconomics Epistemology and economics Ethics and economics Evolutionary biology Experienced utility Experimental economics Falsificationism Free-rider problem Happiness Hedonism History of economic thought Human Development Index Hume, D. Hutchison, T. Interpersonal utility comparisons Justice Kahneman, D. Material welfare school Methodology of economics Models Naturalism Neuroeconomics Ontology and economics Pareto efficiency Philosophy and economics Philosophy of science Popper, K. Positive–normative dichotomy Positivism Postmodernism Preferences Rational choice theory Rawls, J. Robbins, L. Sen, A. Social contract Ultimatum game Utilitarianism Value judgements Welfare economics 

JEL Classifications

B1 
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Copyright information

© Macmillan Publishers Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Wade Hands
    • 1
  1. 1.