The New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics

2018 Edition
| Editors: Macmillan Publishers Ltd

Labour Supply of Women

  • Mark R. Killingsworth
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-349-95189-5_1160

Abstract

This article reviews theoretical and empirical work on the labour supply of women in modern times, with special reference to women in Western economies, primarily the United States.

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© Macmillan Publishers Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mark R. Killingsworth
    • 1
  1. 1.