Skip to main content

Children’s Contributions in Family Work: Two Cultural Paradigms

Part of the Geographies of Children and Young People book series (GCYP,volume 5)

Abstract

This chapter discusses two cultural paradigms of children’s involvement in family and community endeavors that channel many aspects of children’s everyday lives and their families’ approaches to child rearing. One paradigm – in which children are segregated from many family and community endeavors – is commonly assumed in scholarship on children’s development to characterize childhood generally, but this paradigm is likely to be limited to highly schooled communities like those of many researchers. In a distinct paradigm that occurs in some communities in which Western schooling has not been prevalent, children are integrated as valued, mutual contributors in family and community endeavors. Theories of motivation and prosocial development do not yet adequately account for learning paradigms related to children’s integration as collaborative contributors in mature endeavors.

The chapter examines how each paradigm organizes children’s contributions in everyday household work, with an illustration of cultural differences between two communities in Mexico. It appears that in the paradigm where children are integrated as collaborative contributors in shared, mutual family responsibilities, children regularly take initiative to make complex prosocial contributions and their mothers value their helpfulness. By contrast, it appears that in the paradigm where children are segregated from mature family responsibilities, they contribute minimally, they seldom take initiative in family work, and their mothers assign them their “own” chores to do and rarely expect children’s help without adult management. Our chapter considers the potential ramifications of the segregation or collaborative integration of children in meaningful and mutual roles in family and community endeavors.

Keywords

  • Childhood
  • Chores
  • Collaboration
  • Culture
  • Initiative
  • Indigenous
  • Mexico
  • Middle class
  • Motive
  • Prosocial helping
  • Schooling
  • Socialization

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Fig. 1
Fig. 2

References

  • Alcalá, L., Rogoff, B., Mejía-Arauz, R., Coppens, A. D., & Dexter, A. L. (2014). Children’s initiative in contributions to family work in Indigenous-heritage and cosmopolitan communities in Mexico. Human Development, 57(2–3), 96–115.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Ames, P. (2013). Learning to be responsible: Young children transitions outside school. Learning, Culture and Social Interaction, 2(3), 143–154.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Blackwell, L. S., Trzesniewski, K., & Dweck, C. S. (2007). Implicit theories of intelligence predict achievement across an adolescent transition: A longitudinal study and an intervention. Child Development, 78, 246–263.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Blake, P. R., McAuliffe, K., Corbit, J., Callaghan, T. C., Barry, O., Bowie, A., et al. (2015). The ontogeny of fairness in seven societies. Nature, 528, 258–261. doi:10.1038/nature15703.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Bolin, I. (2006). Growing up in a culture of respect. Austin: University of Texas Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Bonawitz, E., Shafto, P., Gweon, H., Goodman, N. D., Spelke, E. S., & Schulz, L. (2011). The double-edged sword of pedagogy: Instruction limits spontaneous exploration and discovery. Cognition, 120, 322–330.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Bourdillon, M. F. C., Levison, D., Myers, W. E., & White, B. (2010). Rights and wrongs of children’s work. Piscataway: Rutgers University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Bühler-Niederberger, D., & Schwittek, J. (2014). Young children in Kyrgyzstan: Agency in tight hierarchical structures. Childhood, 21(4), 502–516.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Cardoso Jiménez, R. (2015). Learning and human dignity are built through observation and participation in work. In M. Correa-Chávez, R. Mejía-Arauz, & B. Rogoff (Eds.), Children learn by observing and contributing to family and community endeavors: A cultural paradigm (Advances in child development and behavior, Vol. 49, pp. 289–301). doi:10.1016/bs.acdb.2015.09.004.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Carr, P. B., & Walton, G. M. (2014). Cues of working together fuel intrinsic motivation. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 53, 169–184.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Coppens, A. D., & Alcalá, L. (2015). Supporting children’s initiative: Appreciating family contributions or paying children for chores. In M. Correa-Chávez, R. Mejía-Arauz, & B. Rogoff (Eds.), Children learn by observing and contributing to family and community endeavors: A cultural paradigm (Advances in child development and behavior, Vol. 49, pp. 91–112). doi:10.1016/bs.acdb.2015.10.002.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Coppens, A. D., Alcalá, L., Mejía-Arauz, R., & Rogoff, B. (2014a). Children’s initiative in family household work in Mexico. Human Development, 57(2–3), 116–130.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Coppens, A. D., Silva, K. G., Ruvalcaba, O., Alcalá, L., López, A., & Rogoff, B. (2014b). Learning by observing and pitching in: Benefits and processes of expanding repertoires. Human Development, 57(2–3), 150–161.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Corona Caraveo, Y. (2006). Todos como uno: La participación infantil en comunidades de tradición indígena. Presented at the III Conferencia de la Red Latinoamericana y del Caribe de Childwatch International, Mexico, D.F.

    Google Scholar 

  • Corona Caraveo, Y., Pérez, C., & Hernández, J. (2010). Youth participation in indigenous traditional communities. In B. Percy-Smith & N. Thomas (Eds.), A handbook of children and young people’s participation (pp. 141–149). New York: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Correa-Chávez, M., Mejía-Arauz, R., & Rogoff, B. (Eds.). (2015). Children learn by observing and contributing to family and community endeavors: A cultural paradigm (Advances in child development and behavior, Vol. 49). Waltham: Academic Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Damon, W., Menon, J., & Bronk, K. C. (2003). The development of purpose during adolescence. Applied Developmental Science, 7, 119–128.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Danziger, K. (1997). Naming the mind: How psychology found its language. London: Sage.

    Google Scholar 

  • de Haan, M. (1999). Learning as cultural practice: How children learn in a Mexican Mazahua community. Amsterdam: Thela Thelis.

    Google Scholar 

  • Dweck, C. S., Walton, G. M., & Cohen, G. L. (2011). Academic tenacity: Mindsets and skills that promote long-term learning. Seattle: White paper prepared for Gates Foundation.

    Google Scholar 

  • Eisenberg, N., Fabes, R. A., & Spinrad, T. L. (2006). Prosocial development. In W. Damon, R. M. Lerner, & N. Eisenberg (Eds.), Handbook of Child Psychology (Social, Emotional, and Personality Development, Vol. 3, pp. 646–718). Hoboken: Wiley.

    Google Scholar 

  • Elkonin, D. B. (1972). Toward the problem of stages in the mental development of the child. Soviet Psychology, 10(3), 225–251.

    Google Scholar 

  • Elliott, E. S., & Dweck, C. S. (1988). Goals: An approach to motivation and achievement. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 54(1), 5–12.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Farrington, C. A., Roderick, M., Allensworth, E., Nagaoka, J., Keyes, T. S., Johnson, D. W., & Beechum, N. O. (2012). Teaching adolescents to become learners. The role of noncognitive factors in shaping school performance: A critical literature review. Chicago: University of Chicago Consortium on Chicago School Research.

    Google Scholar 

  • Fryberg, S. A., & Markus, H. R. (2007). Cultural models of education in American Indian, Asian American and European American contexts. Social Psychology of Education, 10, 213–246.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Fuligni, A. J. (2001). Family obligation and the academic motivation of adolescents from Asian, Latin American, and European backgrounds. New Directions for Child and Adolescent Development, 94, 61–75.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Fuligni, A. J., & Telzer, E. H. (2013). Another way family can get in the head and under the skin: The neurobiology of helping the family. Child Development Perspectives, 7(3), 138–142.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Gaskins, S. (1999). Children’s daily lives in a Mayan village. In A. Göncü (Ed.), Children’s engagement in the world (pp. 25–61). New York: Cambridge University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Good Eshelman, C. (2005). Ejes conceptuales entre los Nahuas de Guerrero: Expresión de un modelo fenomenológico mesoamericano. Estudios de Cultura Nahuatl, 36, 87–113.

    Google Scholar 

  • Goodnow, J. J. (1988). Children’s household work. Psychological Bulletin, 103(1), 5–26.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Goodnow, J. J. (1998). Beyond the overall balance: The significance of particular tasks and procedures for perceptions of fairness in distributions of household work. Social Justice Research, 11(3), 359–376.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Goodnow, J. J., Bowes, J. M., Warton, P. M., Dawes, L. J., & Taylor, A. J. (1991). Would you ask someone else to do this task? Parents’ and children’s ideas about household work requests. Developmental Psychology, 27(5), 817–828.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Goodnow, J. J., & Delaney, S. (1989). Children’s household work: Task differences, styles of assignment, and links to family relationships. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology., 10, 209–226.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Grusec, J. E., Goodnow, J. J., & Cohen, L. (1996). Household work and the development of concern for others. Developmental Psychology, 32(6), 999–1007.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Harkness, S., Super, C. M., Ríos Bermúdez, M., Moscardino, U., Rha, J.-H., Johnston Mavridis, C.,…Olaf Zylicz, P. (2010). Parental ethnotheories of children’s learning. In D. F. Lancy, J. Bock & S. Gaskins (Eds.), The anthropology of learning in childhood (pp. 65–81). Lanham: Alta Mira Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Harkness, S., Zylicz, P. O., Super, C. M., Welles-Nyström, B., Bermúdez, M. R., Bonichini, S.,…Mavridis, C. J. (2011). Children’s activities and their meanings for parents. Journal of Family Psychology, 25(6), 799–813. doi: 10.1037/a0026204

    Google Scholar 

  • Hedegaard, M., Edwards, A., & Fleer, M. (Eds.). (2012). Motives in children’s development: Cultural-historical approaches. New York: Cambridge University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hernández, D. J. (1994). Children’s changing access to resources: A historical perspective. Social Policy Report, VIII(1), 1–24.

    Google Scholar 

  • James, A., Jenks, C., & Prout, A. (1998). Theorizing childhood. Cambridge, UK: Blackwell.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kâğitçibaşi, C. (2005). Autonomy and relatedness in cultural context: Implications for self and family. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 36(4), 403–422.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Kamins, M. L., & Dweck, C. S. (1999). Person versus process praise and criticism: Implications for contingent self-worth and coping. Developmental Psychology, 35(3), 835–847.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Klein, W., & Goodwin, M. H. (2013). Chores. In E. Ochs & T. Kremer-Sadlik (Eds.), Fast-forward family: Home, work, and relationships in middle-class America (pp. 111–129). Berkeley: University of California Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Klein, W., Graesch, A. P., & Izquierdo, C. (2009). Children and chores. Anthropology of Work Review, 30(3), 98–109.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Kremer-Sadlik, T., Fatigante, M., & Fasulo, A. (2008). Discourses on family time: The cultural interpretation of family togetherness in Los Angeles and Rome. Ethos, 36(3), 283–309.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Lancy, D. F., Bock, J., & Gaskins, S. (Eds.). (2010). The anthropology of learning in childhood. Walnut Creek: Altamira Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Lareau, A. (2000). Social class and the daily lives of children. Childhood, 7(2), 155–171.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Larson, R. W. (2011). Positive development in a disorderly world. Journal of Research on Adolescence, 21(2), 317–334.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Larson, R. W., & Verma, S. (1999). How children and adolescents spend time across the world: Work, play, and developmental opportunities. Psychological Bulletin, 125(6), 701–736.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Lee, D. (1961). Autonomous motivation. In F. C. Gruber (Ed.), Anthropology and education (pp. 103–123). Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania.

    Google Scholar 

  • Leont'ev, A. N. (1978). Activity, consciousness and personality. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice-Hall.

    Google Scholar 

  • Liebel, M. (2001). The dignity of the working child: What children in Nicaragua, El Salvador and Guatemala think about their work. In M. Liebel, B. Overwien, & A. Recknagel (Eds.), Working children’s protagonism: Social movements and empowerment in Latin America, Africa, and India (pp. 53–66). Frankfurt/London: IKO (Verlag für interkulturelle Kommunikation).

    Google Scholar 

  • Liebel, M. (2004). A will of their own: Cross-cultural perspectives on working children. London: Zed Books.

    Google Scholar 

  • López, A., Rogoff, B., Najafi, B., & Mejía-Arauz, R. (2012). Collaboration and helping as cultural practices. In J. Valsiner (Ed.), The Oxford handbook of culture and psychology (pp. 869–884). New York: Oxford University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Lorente Fernández, D. (2006). Infancia nahua y transmisión de la cosmovisión: Los ahuaques o espíritus pluviales en la Sierra de Texcoco, México [Nahua childhood and transmission of worldview: The ahuaques or rain spirits in the Sierra of Texcoco, México]. Boletin de Antropologia Universidad de Antioquia, 20(37), 152–168.

    Google Scholar 

  • Lorente Fernández, D. (2015). Children’s everyday learning by assuming responsibility for others: Indigenous practices as a cultural heritage across generations. In M. Correa-Chávez, R. Mejía-Arauz, & B. Rogoff (Eds.), Children learn by observing and contributing to family and community endeavors: A cultural paradigm (Advances in child development and behavior, Vol. 49, pp. 53–89). doi:10.1016/bs.acdb.2015.08.005.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Martí, F. A. (2011). Quieren comprar! (They want to buy!): Children's participation in and socialization around family home businesses in urban Chiapas, Mexico. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association, Montreal, QC.

    Google Scholar 

  • Matusov, E. (1998). When solo activity is not privileged. Human Development, 41, 326–349.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Medin, D. L., & Bang, M. (2014). Who’s asking? Native science, Western science, and science education. Cambridge: MIT Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Mejía-Arauz, R., Correa-Chávez, M., Keyser Ohrt, U., & Aceves-Azuara, I. (2015). Collaborative work or individual chores: The role of social organization in children’s learning to collaborate and develop initiative. In M. Correa-Chávez, R. Mejía-Arauz, & B. Rogoff (Eds.), Children learn by observing and contributing to family and community endeavors: A cultural paradigm. (Advances in Child Development and Behavior, Vol. 49, pp. 25–52).

    Google Scholar 

  • Mejía-Arauz, R., Keyser Ohrt, U., & Correa-Chávez, M. (2013). Transformaciones culturales y generacionales en la participación colaborativa de niñas y niños de una comunidad P'urhépecha. Revista Mexicana de Investigación Educativa, 18, 1019–1045.

    Google Scholar 

  • Morelli, G., Rogoff, B., & Angelillo, C. (2003). Cultural variation in young children’s access to work or involvement in specialized child-focused activities. International Journal of Behavioral Development, 27(3), 264–274.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Mosier, C., & Rogoff, B. (2003). Privileged treatment of toddlers: Cultural aspects of individual choice and responsibility. Developmental Psychology, 39, 1047–1060.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Mueller, C. M., & Dweck, C. S. (1998). Praise for intelligence can undermine children’s motivation and performance. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 75(1), 33–52.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Nieuwenhuys, O. (1994). Children’s lifeworlds: Gender, welfare, and labor in the developing world. London: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Ochs, E., & Kremer-Sadlik, T. (Eds.). (2013). Fast-forward family: Home, work, and relationships in middle-class America. Berkeley: University of California Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Orellana, M. F. (2001). The work kids do. Harvard Educational Review, 71(3), 366–389.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Over, H., & Carpenter, M. (2009). Eighteen-month-old infants show increased helping following priming with affiliation. Psychological Science, 20(10), 1189–1193.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Over, H., & Carpenter, M. (2013). The social side of imitation. Child Development Perspectives, 7(1), 6–11.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Paoli, A. (2003). El trabajo-juego en la milpa Educación, autonomía y lekil kuxlejal: Aproximaciones sociolingüísticas a la sabiduría de los tseltales (pp. 129–140). Mexico: UAM-Xochimilco.

    Google Scholar 

  • Paradise, R. (1998). What’s different about learning in schools as compared to family and community settings? Human Development, 41, 270–278.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Paradise, R. (2005). Motivación e iniciativa en el aprendizaje informal. Sinéctica, 26, 12–21.

    Google Scholar 

  • Paradise, R., & de Haan, M. (2009). Responsibility and reciprocity: Social organization of Mazahua learning practices. Anthropology & Education Quarterly, 40(2), 187–204.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Paradise, R., Mejía-Arauz, R., Silva, K. G., Dexter, A. L., & Rogoff, B. (2014). One, two, three, eyes on me! Adults attempting control versus guiding in support of initiative. Human Development, 57(2–3), 131–149.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Paradise, R., & Rogoff, B. (2009). Side by side: Learning by observing and pitching in. Ethos, 37(1), 102–138.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Plaut, V. C., & Markus, H. R. (2005). The “inside” story: A cultural-historical analysis of being smart and motivated, American style. In A. J. Elliot & C. S. Dweck (Eds.), The handbook of competence and motivation (pp. 457–488). New York: Guilford.

    Google Scholar 

  • Punch, S. (2001). Negotiating autonomy: Childhoods in rural Bolivia. In L. Alanen & B. Mayall (Eds.), Conceptualizing child-adult relations (pp. 23–36). London: RoutledgeFalmer.

    Google Scholar 

  • Punch, S. (2003). Childhoods in the majority world: Miniature adults or tribal children? Sociology, 37(2), 277–295.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Ramírez, M., III, & Price-Williams, D. R. (1976). Achievement motivation in children of three ethnic groups in the United States. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 7(1), 49–60.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Ramírez Sánchez, M. A. (2007). “Helping at home”: The concept of childhood and work among the Nahuas of Tlaxcala, Mexico. In B. Hungerland, M. Liebel, B. Milne, & A. Wihstutz (Eds.), Working to be someone (pp. 87–95). London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.

    Google Scholar 

  • Rogoff, B. (1990). Apprenticeship in thinking. New York: Oxford University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Rogoff, B. (1998). Cognition as a collaborative process. In D. Kuhn & R. S. Siegler (Eds.), Cognition, perception, and language (5th ed., Vol. 2, pp. 679–744). New York: Wiley.

    Google Scholar 

  • Rogoff, B. (2003). The cultural nature of human development. New York: Oxford University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Rogoff, B. (2014). Learning by observing and pitching in to family and community endeavors: An orientation. Human Development, 57(2–3), 69–81.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Rogoff, B. (2016). Culture and participation: A paradigm shift. Current Opinion in Psychology, 8, 182–189. doi:10.1016/j.copsyc.2015.12.002.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Rogoff, B., Alcalá, L., Coppens, A. D., López, A., Ruvalcaba, O., & Silva, K. G. (Eds.). (2014a). Learning by observing and pitching in to family and community endeavors. Special issue of Human Development, 57(2–3).

    Google Scholar 

  • Rogoff, B., Moore, L. C., Correa-Chávez, M., & Dexter, A. L. (2015). Children develop cultural repertoires through engaging in everyday routines and practices. In J. E. Grusec & P. D. Hastings (Eds.), Handbook of socialization (2nd ed., pp. 472–498). New York: The Guilford Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Rogoff, B., Morelli, G., & Chavajay, P. (2010). Children’s integration in communities and segregation from people of differing ages. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 5(4), 431–440.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Rogoff, B., Najafi, B., & Mejía-Arauz, R. (2014a). Constellations of cultural practices across generations: Indigenous American heritage and learning by observing and pitching in. Human Development, 57(2–3), 82–95.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Roth, W.-M. (2011). Object/motives and emotion: A cultural-historical activity theoretic approach to motivation in learning and work. In D. M. McInerney, R. A. Walker, & G. A. D. Liem (Eds.), Sociocultural theories of learning and motivation (pp. 43–64). Charlotte: Information Age Publishing.

    Google Scholar 

  • Ryan, R. M., & Powelson, C. L. (1991). Autonomy and relatedness as fundamental to motivation and education. Journal of Experimental Education, 60(1), 49–66.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Sloane, S., Baillargeon, R., & Premack, D. (2012). Do infants have a sense of fairness? Psychological Science, 23(2), 196–204.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Solís, J., Siham Fernández, J., & Alcalá, L. (2013). Mexican immigrant children and youth’s contributions to a community centro: Exploring civic engagement and citizen constructions. In Youth Engagement: The Civic-Political Lives of Children and Youth, 16, 177–200.

    Google Scholar 

  • Stephens, N. M., Fryberg, S. A., Markus, H. R., Johnson, C. S., & Covarrubias, R. (2012). Unseen disadvantage: How American universities’ focus on independence undermines the academic performance of first-generation college students. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 102(6), 1178–1197.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Thomas, R. K. (1958). Cherokee values and worldview. University of North Carolina. Retrieved from http://works.bepress.com/robert_thomas/40

  • Vanderbeck, R. M. (2009). Gypsy-traveller young people and the spaces of social welfare: A critical ethnography. ACME: An International E-Journal for Critical Geographies, 8(2), 304–339.

    Google Scholar 

  • Walker, R., Pressick-Kilborn, K., Sainsbury, E., & MacCallum, J. (2010). A sociocultural approach to motivation: A long time coming but here at last. In T. C. Urdan & S. A. Karabenick (Eds.), The decade ahead: Applications and contexts of motivation and achievement (Advances in motivation and achievement, Vol. 16, pp. 1–42). Bingley: Emerald Group Publishing.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Walton, G. M., & Cohen, G. L. (2011). Sharing motivation. In D. Dunning (Ed.), Social motivation (pp. 79–101). New York: Psychology Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Warton, P. M., & Goodnow, J. J. (1991). The nature of responsibility: Children’s understanding of “your job”. Child Development, 62(1), 156–165.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Yeager, D. S., Henderson, M., Paunesku, D., Walton, G. M., D’Mello, S., Spitzer, B. J., & Duckworth, A. L. (2014). Boring but important: A self-transcendent purpose for learning fosters academic self-regulation. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 107(4), 559–580. doi:10.1037/a0037637.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Zelizer, V. A. (1985). Pricing the priceless child. New York: Basic Books.

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding authors

Correspondence to Andrew D. Coppens or Barbara Rogoff .

Editor information

Editors and Affiliations

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

Copyright information

© 2016 Springer Science+Business Media Singapore

About this entry

Cite this entry

Coppens, A.D., Alcalá, L., Rogoff, B., Mejía-Arauz, R. (2016). Children’s Contributions in Family Work: Two Cultural Paradigms. In: Punch, S., Vanderbeck, R., Skelton, T. (eds) Families, Intergenerationality, and Peer Group Relations. Geographies of Children and Young People, vol 5. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-4585-92-7_11-1

Download citation

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-4585-92-7_11-1

  • Received:

  • Accepted:

  • Published:

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Singapore

  • Online ISBN: 978-981-4585-92-7

  • eBook Packages: Springer Reference Social SciencesReference Module Humanities and Social Sciences

Chapter History

  1. Latest

    Children’s Contributions in Family Work: Two Cultural Paradigms
    Published:
    03 November 2016

    DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-4585-92-7_11-2

  2. Original

    Children’s Contributions in Family Work: Two Cultural Paradigms
    Published:
    04 August 2016

    DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-4585-92-7_11-1