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Planning Technologies for Interactive Storytelling

Living reference work entry

Abstract

Since AI planning was first proposed for the task of narrative generation in interactive storytelling (IS), it has emerged as the dominant approach in this field. This chapter traces the use of planning technologies in this area, considers the core issues involved in the application of planning technologies in IS, and identifies some of the remaining challenges.

Keywords

Crowdsourcing gadin system Hierarchical task networks (HTNs) Interactive storytelling (IS) Automated domain authoring Boundary problem Causality Character-based approaches Flexibility Generative power Goal of Intent-based narrative planning Manual domain authoring Minimal representational assumptions Narrative control Narrative planning goals Narrative plans Plan failure Role of Plan quality criteria Plan-based narrative generation Plot-based approaches Real-time response Story and discourse Story progression Visual programming Planning domain model Sayanything system Scheherazade system 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Singapore 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of ComputingTeesside UniversityMiddlesbroughUK

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