Encyclopedia of Educational Philosophy and Theory

2017 Edition
| Editors: Michael A. Peters

Dewey on Ethics and Moral Education

  • Douglas J. Simpson
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-287-588-4_45

Introduction

John Dewey’s views of ethics and moral education, like his democratic ideals, arise in part from his naturalistic and pragmatic philosophy. In turn, he integrates these ideas with his political and educational philosophy, creating a picture of the means to and the nucleus of a good life. This life is tied to what he (1937/1987, p. 298) deems “the fundamental principle of democracy”: “the ends of freedom and individuality for all can be attained only by means that accord with those ends.” His (1916/1980, p. 370) idea of a good life is marked by an intensified and expanding consciousness that enjoys “a continual beginning afresh.” Likewise, this life involves a deep-seated interest in the common good that entails addressing a web of interconnected philosophical, scientific, economic, social, political, and educational concerns. More than, perhaps, most pragmatists, he offers the advantages and challenges of a nuanced system of thought as he reconstructs the meanings of many...

This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access.

References

  1. Dewey, J. (1901) 1990. Educational lectures before Brigham Young Academy. In Jo Ann Boydston (Ed.), John Dewey, the later works, 1925–1953 (Vol. 17, pp. 211–347). Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar
  2. Dewey, J. (1903) 1977. Democracy in education. In Jo Ann Boydston (Ed.), John Dewey: The middle works,1899–1924 (Vol. 3, pp. 229–239). Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar
  3. Dewey, J. (1916) 1980. Democracy and education. In Jo Ann Boydston (Ed.), John Dewey: The middle works: 1899–1924 (Vol. 9, pp. 1–370). Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar
  4. Dewey, J. (1920) 1982a. Reconstruction in philosophy. In Jo Ann Boydston (Ed.), John Dewey: The middle works, 1899–1924 (Vol. 12, pp. 77–201). Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar
  5. Dewey, J. (1920) 1982b. Introduction: Reconstruction as seen twenty-five years later. In Jo Ann Boydston (Ed.), John Dewey: The middle works, 1899–1924 (Vol. 12, pp. 257–277), Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar
  6. Dewey, J. (1922) 1983. Human nature and conduct: An introduction to social psychology. In Jo Ann Boydston (Ed.), John Dewey: The middle works, 1899–1924 (Vol. 14, pp. 1–254). Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar
  7. Dewey, J. (1925) 1984a. The development of American pragmatism. In Jo Ann Boydston (Ed.), John Dewey: The later works, 1925–1953 (Vol. 2, pp. 3–21). Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar
  8. Dewey, J. (1929) 1984b.The sources of a science of education. In Jo Ann Boydston (Ed.), John Dewey: The later works, 19291930 (Vol. 5, pp. 1–40). Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar
  9. Dewey, J. (1933) 1986. How we think. In Jo Ann Boydston (Ed.), John Dewey: The later works, 1925–1953 (Rev. ed., Vol. 8, pp. 105–352). Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar
  10. Dewey, J. (1937) 1987. Democracy is radical. In Jo Ann Boydston (Ed.), John Dewey: The later works, 1925–1953 (Vol. 11, pp. 296–299). Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar
  11. Dewey, J. (1938) 1988a. Experience and education. In Jo Ann Boydston (Ed.), John Dewey: The later works, 19251953 (Vol. 13, pp. 1–62). Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar
  12. Dewey, J. (1938) 1988b. Freedom and culture. In Jo Ann Boydston (Ed.), John Dewey: The later works, 1925–1953 (Vol. 13, pp. 136–55). Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar
  13. Dewey, J. (1946) 1990, 473. What is democracy?. In Jo Ann Boydston (Ed.), John Dewey: The later works, 1925–1953 (Vol. 17, pp. 471–474). Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar
  14. Dewey, J., & Tufts, J. H. (1932) 1985. Ethics. In Jo Ann Boydston (Ed.), John Dewey: The later works, 19251953 (Rev. ed., Vol. 7, pp. 1–462). Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar
  15. Fesmire, S. (2003). John Dewey & moral imagination. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.Google Scholar
  16. Menand, L. (2001). The metaphysical club. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux.Google Scholar
  17. Pappas, G. F. (2008). John Dewey’s ethics: Democracy as experience. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.Google Scholar
  18. Simpson, D. J. (2011). Neo-Deweyan moral education. In J. L. DeVitis & T. Yu (Eds.), Character and moral education (pp. 207–226). New York: Peter Lang.Google Scholar
  19. Simpson, D., & Sacken, D. (2014). The sympathetic-empathetic Teacher: A Deweyan analysis. Journal of Philosophy and History of Education, 64(1), 1–20.Google Scholar
  20. Simpson, D. J., Jackson, M. J. B., & Aycock, J. C. (2005). John Dewey and the art of teaching. Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Singapore 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Texas Christian UniversityFort WorthUSA
  2. 2.Texas Tech UniversityLubbockUSA