Encyclopedia of Educational Philosophy and Theory

2017 Edition
| Editors: Michael A. Peters

Narrative Assessment: A Sociocultural View

  • Bronwen Cowie
  • Margaret Carr
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-287-588-4_396

Synonyms

Introduction

From our earliest time stories have played a critical role in recording events, providing insight into ideas, rallying support, and entertaining us. In different ways, all stories serve a purpose, even if to simply relay a message. We can think of examples from, for example, the paintings in the Lascaux Caves in the Pyrenees mountains in southern France (15,000 and 13,000 BC), to the Epic of Gilgamesh carved on a stone pillars (700 BC), to the oral traditions that kept Aesop’s fables alive (Aesop lived in 500 BC and his stories were written down in 200 BC), the parables in the Bible, Shakespeare’s plays (as text and performed), Martin Luther King’s speeches, and Steve Jobs’ keynotes to launch new products. As this selective overview reminds us, stories can be communicated and passed from person to person through a variety of modes and media, often in combination. Their power lies in their capacity to capture complexity,...

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.The University of WaikatoHamiltonNew Zealand

Section editors and affiliations

  • Bronwen Cowie
    • 1
  1. 1.University of WaikatoHamiltonNew Zealand