Encyclopedia of Educational Philosophy and Theory

2017 Edition
| Editors: Michael A. Peters

Lyotard and Philosophy of Education

Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-287-588-4_340

Jean-François Lyotard is considered by most commentators, justly or not, as the non-Marxist philosopher of “the postmodern condition” (sometimes referred to as “postmodernity”). His The Postmodern Condition: A Report on Knowledge (1984), originally published in Paris in 1979, became an instant cause célèbre. The book crystallized in an original interpretation a study of the status and development of knowledge, science, and technology in advanced capitalist societies. The Postmodern Conditionwas important for a number of reasons. It developed a philosophical interpretation of the changing state of knowledge, science, and education in the most highly developed societies, reviewing and synthesizing research on contemporary science within the broader context of the sociology of postindustrial society and studies of postmodern culture. Lyotard brought together for the first time diverse threads and previously separate literatures in an analysis which many commentators and critics believed...

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Singapore 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of WaikatoHamiltonNew Zealand