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Dostoevsky, Destructiveness, and Education

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Synonyms

Dostoevsky; Literature; Ethics; Teaching; Destructiveness

Introduction

Fyodor Dostoevsky is widely regarded as one of the most influential novelists of the nineteenth century. His work has been engaged by scholars in a range of different fields, including philosophy, psychology, sociology, politics, theology, jurisprudence, and medicine. Dostoevsky also has much to offer educationists, particularly those with an interest in ethical questions. This chapter provides a brief overview of Dostoevsky’s life and major publications, discusses the importance of “destructiveness” as a theme in his work, and considers some of the educational implications of his ideas.

Dostoevsky’s Life and Published Work

Born in 1821 in Moscow, Dostoevsky lived a difficult and unsettled life. Both his parents died while he was still in his teens. After completing a course of study in military engineering at St Petersburg, he turned his attention to literary pursuits, earning high praise from the...

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References

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Correspondence to Peter Roberts .

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Roberts, P. (2017). Dostoevsky, Destructiveness, and Education. In: Peters, M. (eds) Encyclopedia of Educational Philosophy and Theory. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-287-532-7_556-1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-287-532-7_556-1

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  • Print ISBN: 978-981-287-532-7

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