Encyclopedia of Educational Philosophy and Theory

Living Edition
| Editors: Michael A. Peters

Rousseau on Bildung and Morality

  • Kimmo Kontio
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-287-532-7_438-1

Introduction

When the idea of Bildung is attached to Rousseau’s educational thinking, it is, of course, an anachronism. The idea of Bildung emerged in relation to the emergence of classical German idealism and is profoundly intertwined with its fundamental philosophical motives. When speaking about German idealism, we do not refer to a monolithic idea but to the thematically rich and complex philosophical discourse that often includes contradictory views on the fundamental philosophical concepts. If there is a common denominator that characterizes all the philosophies of German idealism, it is that they are all theories of freedom and this fundamental motivation is definitely Rousseauian in spirit. It was Rousseau who “discovered” the peculiar concept of autonomy that inherits from (and advanced) Kant to become a shared aspect of German idealism. It is this concept of autonomy on which the modern tradition of Bildung is based. It should be possible, then, to reconstruct the idea of Bildung...

Keywords

Moral Reason Moral Order Natural Goodness Moral Perspective Natural Education 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Singapore 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of OuluOuluFinland