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Intellectual Virtues and Educational Practice

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“Virtue epistemology” is an approach to the philosophical study of knowledge that foregrounds “intellectual virtues” such as curiosity, open-mindedness, intellectual humility, and intellectual courage. Intellectual virtues so conceived are the character traits of a good thinker, learner, or inquirer.

Intellectual virtues are also related to but distinct from natural cognitive ability. A person can be extremely intellectually “gifted” while also being intellectually arrogant, careless, or lazy. Conversely, a person of mediocre natural intelligence can be highly curious, open, careful, and thorough in her thinking. Again, intellectual virtues are the strengths of character needed for the competent and successful pursuit of “epistemic goods” like knowledge and understanding (Baehr 2011: Chap. 2).

Intellectual Virtues as an Educational Aim

Intellectual virtue concepts are useful for fleshing out a plausible but elusive “third aim” of education. To be sure, a good education will equip...

Keywords

  • Classroom Environment
  • Educational Practice
  • Intellectual Virtue
  • Virtue Epistemology
  • Intellectual Skill

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Correspondence to Jason Baehr .

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Baehr, J. (2016). Intellectual Virtues and Educational Practice. In: Peters, M. (eds) Encyclopedia of Educational Philosophy and Theory. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-287-532-7_376-1

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