Encyclopedia of Geropsychology

2017 Edition
| Editors: Nancy A. Pachana

Dynamic Analyses to Optimise Ageing (DYNOPTA)

  • Kim M. KielyEmail author
  • Richard A. Burns
  • Kaarin J. Anstey
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-287-082-7_53

Definition

The Dynamic Analyses to Optimise Ageing (DYNOPTA) project has harmonized and pooled nine epidemiological studies of human aging to examine pathways to compressing morbidity and optimizing healthy aging in the Australian population. Research using the DYNOPTA dataset has focused on four main outcomes that contribute to disease and disability burden among older adults: cognitive function, sensory function, mental health, and mobility or activity limitations.

Project Background and Aims

DYNOPTA is a cross-institutional and multidisciplinary project that has harmonized and pooled nine independently designed longitudinal studies of aging, creating a large nationally representative dataset of older adults in Australia. Aggregating data from a number of cohort studies has the advantages of enhancing population coverage (reducing coverage error), increasing sample size of underrepresented groups (such as the oldest old or those with rare medical conditions), facilitating...

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Singapore 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kim M. Kiely
    • 1
    Email author
  • Richard A. Burns
    • 1
  • Kaarin J. Anstey
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for Research on Ageing Health and Wellbeing, Research School of Population HealthThe Australian National UniversityCanberraAustralia