Encyclopedia of Geropsychology

2017 Edition
| Editors: Nancy A. Pachana

Dementia and Neurocognitive Disorders

  • Kamini KrishnanEmail author
  • Glenn E. Smith
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-287-082-7_301

Synonyms

Dementia and major neurocognitive disorder; Mild cognitive impairment and minor neurocognitive disorder

Definition

Dementia and neurocognitive disorder: In the latest edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual Fifth Edition (DSM-5), the American Psychiatric Association panel subsumed the term “dementia” and its etiologies under the category “major neurocognitive disorder” (MND) or “minor neurocognitive disorder” (mND) based on disease severity (Ganguli et al. 2011; American Psychiatric Association 2013).

Introduction

The American Psychiatric Association retired the term “dementia” and introduced “major neurocognitive disorder” in the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-5) to emphasize the neurological origin of the degenerative disorders (i.e., presence of known structural or metabolic brain disease). Furthermore, authors proposed this amendment to differentiate neurodegenerative diagnoses from other illness with cognitive sequelae (such as...

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Singapore 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Mayo ClinicRochesterUSA
  2. 2.University of Florida College of Public Health and Health ProfessionsGainesvilleUSA