Encyclopedia of Geropsychology

Living Edition
| Editors: Nancy A. Pachana

Migration and Aging

  • Shuang LiuEmail author
  • Laura Simpson Reeves
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-287-080-3_292-1

Synonyms

Definition

Human migration refers to the movement by people from one place to another with the intention of settling temporarily or permanently in the new location. Migration can refer to movement from one country to another or to movement within the same country, such as rural farmers moving to cities to permanently settle in urban areas. This entry, however, focuses on international migration, which almost always involves cultural transition.

International Migration and Cross-Cultural Adjustment of Older Immigrants

Globally, international migration has been steadily increasing. According to the Population Division of the Department of Economic and Social Affairs of the United Nations (www.unpopulation.org), the number of international migrants worldwide reached 232 million in 2013, an increase from 175 million in 2000 and 154 million in 1990. A growing concentration of international migrants is found in developed regions. In 2013,...

Keywords

International Migration Adult Child Aged Care Successful Aging Filial Piety 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access.

References

  1. Berry, J. W. (2005). Acculturation: Living successfully in two cultures. International Journal of Intercultural Relations, 29, 697–712.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Chou, K. L. (2007). Psychological distress in migrants in Australia over 50 years old: A longitudinal investigation. Journal of Affective Disorders, 98(1–2), 99–108.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Chow, N. (2004). Asian value and aged care. Geriatrics and Gerontology International, 4(1), 21–25.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Haslam, C., Cruwys, T., & Haslam, S. A. (2014). “The we’s have it”: Evidence for the distinctive benefits of group engagement in enhancing cognitive health in ageing. Social Science and Medicine, 120, 57–66.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Kristiansen, M., Kessing, L. L., Norredam, M., & Krasnik, A. (2015). Migrants’ perceptions of aging in Denmark and attitudes towards remigration: Findings from a qualitative study. BMC Health Services Research, 15(1), 225–236.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Laragy, C., & Allen, J. (2015). Community aged care case managers transitioning to consumer directed care: More than procedural change required. Australian Social Work, 68, 212–227.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Lee, K. H., & Yoon, D. P. (2011). Factors influencing the general well-being of low-income Korean immigrant elders. Social Work, 56, 269–279.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Lood, Q., Gustafsson, S., & Ivanoff, S. D. (2015). Bridging barriers to health promotion: A feasibility pilot study of the “Promoting Aging Migrants” capabilities study. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice, 21, 604–613.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Migliorino, P. (2013). CALD aged care policy – Past, present and future. Presentation at happy ageing for CALD Australians forum, Brisbane.Google Scholar
  10. Panagiotopoulos, G., Walker, R., & Luszcz, M. (2013). A comparison of widowhood and well-being among older Greek and British-Australian migrant women. Journal of Aging Studies, 27, 519–528.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Park, H.-J., & Kim, C. (2013). Ageing in an inconvenient paradise: The immigrant experiences of older Korean people in New Zealand. Australasian Journal on Ageing, 32, 158–162.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Wong, S. T., Yoo, G., & Steart, A. L. (2006). The changing meaning of family support among older Chinese and Korean immigrants. Journal of Gerontology, 61B, S4–S9.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Singapore 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Communication and ArtsThe University of QueenslandBrisbaneAustralia
  2. 2.Institute for Social Science ResearchThe University of QueenslandBrisbaneAustralia