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Breaches of Academic Integrity Using Collusion

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Abstract

Collusion is consistently identified as one of the most common types of academic integrity breaches and indeed is implicated in many of the most serious actions that compromise academic integrity. This chapter limits its consideration of collusion to that between students in non-examination assessment, i.e., inappropriate collaboration or assistance between students in relation to such assessment tasks. Even in this limited context, the line between appropriate collaboration and collusion is difficult to draw, given the variations in understandings and acceptable practices between students, academics, disciplines, and assessment items, and so is contextually dependent. Further, collusion is by definition a social activity; hence, peer and group norms and loyalties come into play. This chapter considers the nature of collusion, the difficulties inherent with the concept, and the importance of addressing collusion. Suggestions and strategies for mitigating collusion are included.

Keywords

  • Learning Outcome
  • Individual Student
  • Assessment Task
  • Student Interaction
  • Academic Integrity

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Correspondence to Sue McGowan .

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McGowan, S. (2015). Breaches of Academic Integrity Using Collusion. In: Bretag, T. (eds) Handbook of Academic Integrity. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-287-079-7_36-1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-287-079-7_36-1

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