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Fostering Resilience in ‘At-Risk’ Gifted and Talented Young People

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Abstract

Despite efforts around the world to advocate for gifted and talented young people, there are common groups that remain underrepresented in gifted and talented education programs. Two such groups are young people from Indigenous or minority ethnicities and young people living in poverty. These groups are consistently labelled as ‘disadvantaged’, ‘at-risk’ or ‘vulnerable’ and likely represent a large proportion of gifted underachievers. Australasia-Pacific nations have felt the impact of global human rights concerns, despite their relatively isolated location, and this has resulted in increasingly multicultural societies and a rise in issues such as child poverty. These changes are additional to some of the unique collective and individual sociocultural issues that nations in this corner of the globe experience. The focus in this chapter is on gifted young people from Indigenous and minority ethnicities and from low socio-economic circumstances. A range of international and Australasia-Pacific research indicates that a strong sense of identity and caring and supportive relationships are two essential factors for promoting resilience. Some insight into how resilience might be fostered in gifted young people, in particular those from Indigenous and minority ethnicities and from low socio-economic circumstances, will be provided in this chapter.

Keywords

  • Giftedness
  • Risk
  • Resilience
  • Identity
  • Relationships

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Ballam, N. (2021). Fostering Resilience in ‘At-Risk’ Gifted and Talented Young People. In: Smith, S.R. (eds) Handbook of Giftedness and Talent Development in the Asia-Pacific. Springer International Handbooks of Education. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-13-3041-4_14

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