Advertisement

At the Dawn of Revolution in Teaching

A Hybrid Educator’s Prospect of Self-Study in Japan
Living reference work entry
  • 251 Downloads
Part of the Springer International Handbooks of Education book series (SIHE)

Abstract

This chapter investigates the potential of self-study of teacher education practices (S-STEP) in Japan. A concept of teacher education and the term teacher educator are rather new in the Japanese education context. Reflection may be a familiar concept to them; however, its focus is on negative aspect. As a hybrid educator between Japan and Iceland, I reflect on my personal and professional experience of being a student and an educator in the Japanese education system while exploring how S-STEP is discussed. My interview with the progressive teacher educator reveals her struggles that she deals in order to promote the concept of reflection and S-STEP. Cultural and English language are two potential challenges that emanated from the investigation, and they need to be understood in light of their education context. Upon this circumstance, I prospect my role as a critical friend to the Japanese educators and teacher educators for their self-study journey through inquiry in the same mother tongue.

Keywords

S-STEP in Japan Hybrid educator Reflection The Japanese education system Critical friend 

References

  1. Asanuma, S. (2015). Japanese teachers’ struggle for active learning. Presented at the 10th international consortium for Universities of Education in East Asia.Google Scholar
  2. Crowe, A. R., & Dinkelman, T. (2010). Self-study and social studies: Framing the conversation. In A. R. Crowe (Ed.), Advancing social studies education through self-study methodology: The power, promise, and use of self-study in social studies education (pp. 1–20). Dordrecht: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Dudley, P. (2011). Lesson study: A handbook. Retrieved from http://lessonstudy.co.uk/lesson-study-a-handbook/
  4. Fox, H. (1994). Listening to the world. Urbana: National Council of Teachers of English.Google Scholar
  5. Freire, P. (1993). Pedagogy of the oppressed. New York: Continuum.Google Scholar
  6. Ham, V., & Kane, R. (2004). Finding a way through the swamp: A case for self-study as research. In J. J. Loughran, M. L. Hamilton, V. K. LaBoskey, & T. Russell (Eds.), International handbook of self-study of teaching and teacher education practices (Vol. 1, pp. 103–150). Dordrecht: Kluwer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Hiroshima University Educational Vision Research Institute. (2018). Special lecture: Collaboration between teacher education and professional development. Retrieved from http://evri.hiroshima-u.ac.jp/en/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/EVRI_25.pdf
  8. Kim, J., & Hirotane, Y. (2018). The significance and possibility of collaboration between social studies education and history: A self-study of improving a lesson study by two graduate students. The Bulletin of Japanese Curriculum Research and Development, 40(4), 13–24.Google Scholar
  9. Korthagen, F. A. J., Kessels, J., Koster, B., Wubbels, T., & Lagerwerf, B. (2001). Linking theory and practice: The pedagogy of realistic teacher education. London: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Korthagen, F. A. J., Kessels, J., Koster, B., Wubbels, T., & Lagerwerf, B. (2010). Linking theory and practice: The pedagogy of realistic teacher education (N. Takeda, Y. Imaizumi, Y. Suzuki, & E. Yamabe, Trans.). Tokyo: Gakubunsha. (Original work published 2001).Google Scholar
  11. LaBoskey, V. K. (2009). “Name it to claim it”. The methodology of self-study as social justice teacher education. In D. L. Tidwell, M. L. Heston, & L. M. Fitzgerald (Eds.), Research methods for the self-study of teaching and teacher education practice (pp. 73–82). Dordrecht: Springer.Google Scholar
  12. Lewis, C., Perry, R., & Murata, A. (2006). How should research contribute instructional improvement? The case of lesson study. Educational Researcher, 35(3), 3–14.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Loughran, J. J. (2004). Learning through self-study: The influence of purpose, participants and context. In J. J. Loughran, M. L. Hamilton, V. K. LaBoskey, & T. Russell (Eds.), International handbook of self-study of teaching and teacher education practices (Vol. 1, pp. 151–192). Dordrecht: Kluwer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Lunenberg, M., Dengerink, J., & Korthagen, F. A. J. (2014). The professional teacher educator: Roles, behaviour and professional development for teacher educators. Rotterdam: Sense.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Lunenberg, M., Dengerink, J., & Korthagen, F. A. J. (2017). The professional teacher educator: Roles, behaviour and professional development for teacher educators (N. Takeda, E. Yamabe, M. Irisawa & K. Moriyama, Trans.). Tokyo: Gakubunsha. (Original work published 2006).Google Scholar
  16. Markus, H. R., & Kitayama, S. (2010). Cultures and selves: A cycle of mutual constitution. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 5(4), 420–430.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Markus, H. R., Uchida, Y., Omoregie, H., Townsend, S., & Kitayama, S. (2006). Going for the gold: Models of agency in Japanese and American contexts. Psychological Science, 17, 103–112.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. McVeigh, B. J. (2002). Japanese higher education as myth. New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  19. Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology Japan. (2006). Basic act on education (Act no. 120 of December 2006). Retrieved from http://www.mext.go.jp/en/policy/education/lawandplan/title01/detail01/1373798.htm
  20. Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology Japan. (2015). Discussion on active learning (アクティブ・ラーニングに関する議論). Retrieved from http://www.mext.go.jp/b_menu/shingi/chukyo/chukyo3/004/siryo/__icsFiles/afieldfile/2015/09/04/1361407_2_4.pdf
  21. Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology Japan. (2018a). Introduction of the new national curriculum for secondary school (新高等学校学習指導要領について). Retrieved from http://www.mext.go.jp/a_menu/shotou/newcs/1408677.htm
  22. Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology Japan. (2018b). Statistics of MEXT directory 2018 (文部科学統計要覧平成30年度版). Retrieved from http://www.mext.go.jp/b_menu/toukei/002/002b/1403130.htm
  23. Moritani, H., & Iwai, C. (2018). A multiple case study on the role perceptions of English as a foreign language teachers at Japanese universities. Hiroshima University of Economics Journal of Humanities, Social and Natural Sciences, 41(2), 55–70.Google Scholar
  24. Murakoshi, R., & Ehara, Y. (2018). The portfolio guiding EFL teachers to conduct action research for class improvement. Bulletin of Kanagawa Prefectural Institute of Language and Culture Studies, 7(0), 1–12.Google Scholar
  25. Nakada, A., Iwasaki, S., Kanchika, M., Nakao, T., Deguchi, Y., Konishi, A., … Inoue, K. (2016). Relationship between depressive symptoms and perceived individual level occupational stress among Japanese schoolteachers. Industrial Health, 54(5), 396–402.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Nishino, T., & Watanabe, M. (2008). Communication-oriented policies versus classroom realities in Japan. TESOL Quarterly, 42(1), 133–138.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. OECD. (n.d.). Student-teacher ratio and an average class size. Retrieved from https://stats.oecd.org/Index.aspx?DataSetCode=EAG_PERS_RATIO
  28. Oi, M. (2015, August 31). Tackling the deadliest day for Japanese teenagers. BBC News. Retrieved from https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-34105044
  29. Okuno, H. (2007). A critical discussion on the action plan to cultivate “Japanese with English abilities”. The Journal of Asia TEFL, 4(4), 133–158.Google Scholar
  30. Pinnegar, S., & Hamilton, M. L. (2009). Self-study of practice as a genre of qualitative research: Theory, methodology and practice. Dordrecht: Springer.Google Scholar
  31. Pinnegar, S., & Russell, T. (1995). Introduction: Self-study and living educational theory. Teacher Education Quarterly, 22(3), 5–9.Google Scholar
  32. Research Group on Teacher Education. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.teachereducation-jp.org
  33. Samaras, A. P. (2011). Self-study teacher research: Improving your practice through collaborative inquiry. Thousand Oaks: Sage.Google Scholar
  34. Samaras, A. P., Hicks, M. A., & Garvey Berger, J. (2004). Self-study through personal history. In J. J. Loughran, M. L. Hamilton, V. K. LaBoskey, & T. Russell (Eds.), International handbook of self-study of teaching and teacher education practice (pp. 905–942). Dordrecht: Kluwer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Sharf, R. H. (1993). The Zen of Japanese nationalism. History of Religions, 33(1), 1–43.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Suzuki, S. (1995). Zen mind, beginners’ mind. New York: Weatherhill.Google Scholar
  37. Takeda, N. (2009). A demand for introducing the concept of “teachers’ competency”: Agendas for research on teachers’ standard (『教員のコンピテンシー』概念導入の必要性−教員のスタンダード研究の課題). Musashi University Teacher Education Program Annual Report, 23, 29–39. Retrieved from http://www.teachereducation-jp.org/reports_top/reports201203/src/r23-1.pdf.Google Scholar
  38. Takeda, N. (2010). Narrative of teachers in practice: Agendas for teacher education and training (現場教員の語る教員養成と研修の課題). Musashi University Teacher Education Program Annual Report, 24, 19–27. Retrieved from http://www.teachereducation-jp.org/reports_top/reports201203/src/r24-1.pdf.Google Scholar
  39. Takeda, N. (2011a). A Dutch policy for the quality improvement of teachers: The developmental process and the effectiveness of the teacher’s competency model in the Netherlands. The Journal of Human and Culture Sciences, 42(3, 4), 155–184.Google Scholar
  40. Takeda, N. (2011b). Agendas for “research on teacher educator” in Japan (日本における『教師教育者研究』). In Y. Iwata & H. Mitsuishi (Eds.), Current educational reform and teachers: Research on teacher education for future (現代の教育改革と教師 これからの教師教育研究のために) (pp. 183–201). Tokyo: Tokyo Gakugei University Press.Google Scholar
  41. Takeda, N. (2017). Advocate for children and youth. In P. Lorist, A. Swennen, & E. White (Eds.), Teacher educators pathways to becoming research active (pp. 25–28). Retrieved from https://issuu.com/hogeschoolutrecht/docs/teacher_educators_pathways_to_becom/18.Google Scholar
  42. Takeda, N., Kanai, K., & Yokosuka, S. (2013). Reflection workbook for teachers: Recurrence of theory and practice (教員のためのリフレクションワークブック−往還する理論と実践). Tokyo: Gakuji Shuppan.Google Scholar
  43. Takeda, N., Oda, I., Saito, M., & Sasaki, H. (2019). Teacher education and self-study: Learning from J. Loughran. Tokyo: Gakubunsha.Google Scholar
  44. Udagawa, T. (2011). Can we teach in English at a smaller college? Journal of Hokkaido University of Education (Humanities and Social Sciences), 61(2), 49–59.Google Scholar
  45. Watanabe, T. (2017). Research development and issues of social studies teacher education studies between USA and Japan. Bulletin of Japanese Educational Research Association for the Social Studies, 50, 91–100.Google Scholar
  46. Watkins, C., Carnell, E., & Lodge, C. (2007). Effective learning in classrooms. London: Sage.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of EducationUniversity of IcelandReykjavíkIceland

Section editors and affiliations

  • Hafdís Guðjónsdóttir
    • 1
  • Lynn Thomas
  1. 1.School of EducationUniversity of IcelandReykjavikIceland

Personalised recommendations