Advertisement

Methods and Tools of Self-Study

Living reference work entry
  • 246 Downloads
Part of the Springer International Handbooks of Education book series (SIHE)

Abstract

This chapter provides an examination of specific methods used in self-study. We begin the chapter with a discussion of key elements that lead to our definition of what we mean by methods. Methods used for self-study build on traditional qualitative research methods, but the flexibility and creativity that emerge from self-study research lend itself to versatile creative approaches. The specific methods used in self-study often emerge as a particular function of the research. Through a process of examining the research literature where self-study is the methodology of choice, we organize the types of methods used into two major areas: (1) narrative/text-based methods and (2) creative/arts-based methods. We distinguish between what we term concrete narrative and text-based data representation and abstract narrative and text-based data representation. Narrative and text-based data representation considered concrete are those written texts that reflect actual life experiences such as the transcribing of the spoken word or written factual stories reflecting personal or professional histories. Abstract narrative and text-based data reflect the creative art of writing that goes beyond concrete representation and expresses meaning through creativity. Such text creation is defined as arts-based and can be seen in such expressions as creative writing narrative, poetry, and written metaphor. Additional creative/arts-based methods include visual representation, object as data, dance, musical representation, and polyvocal research. Within each of these areas of narrative/text-based and creative/arts-based approaches, we provide examples by describing self-studies using these specific methods.

Keywords

Self-study Research tools Research methods Methodology Narrative Creative methods Arts-based methods 

References

  1. Ainscow, M., & Kaplan, I. (2005). Using evidence to encourage inclusive school development: Possibilities and challenges. Australasian Journal of Special Education, 29(2), 1–14.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Allender, J., & Manke, M. (2002). Reflecting and refracting self-study artifacts: Jazz poetry. In C. Kosnik, A. Freese, & A. P. Samaras (Eds.), Making a difference in teacher education through self-study (pp. 15–19). Proceedings of the fourth international conference on self-study of teacher education practices, Herstmonceux. Retrieved from: http://www.aera.net/SIG109/Conferences/Past-Castle-Proceedings
  3. Bass, L. (2002). Self-study and issues of privilege and race. In C. Kosnik, A. Freese, & A. P. Samaras (Eds.), Making a difference in teacher education through self-study (pp. 20–25). Proceedings of the fourth international conference on self-study of teacher education practices, Herstmonceux. Retrieved from: http://www.aera.net/SIG109/Conferences/Past-Castle-Proceedings
  4. Bazeley, P. (2007). Qualitative data analysis with NVivo. Los Angeles: Sage.Google Scholar
  5. Berg, B. L. (2007). Qualitative research methods for the social sciences (6th ed.). Boston: Pearson.Google Scholar
  6. Beyer, K., & Tidwell, D. L. (2014). Examining professional history as context for instructional meaning – The iterative process of data analysis to inform practice. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, Philadelphia.Google Scholar
  7. Boyd, M. P., & Galda, L. (2011). Real talk in elementary classrooms. New York: The Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  8. Branyon, A., Diacopolous, M., Gregory, K., & Butler, B. (2016). The power of autobiography: Unpacking the past, understanding the present, and impacting the future while establishing a community of practice. In D. Garbett & A. Ovens (Eds.), Enacting self-study as methodology for professional inquiry (pp. 119–126). Proceedings of the 11th international conference on self-study of teacher education practices, Herstmonceux. Retrieved from http://www.aera.net/SIG109/Conferences/Past-Castle-Proceedings
  9. Brubaker, N. D. (2014). Gendered discourse in the evangelical south: Fashioning a conservatively critical pedagogy of teacher education. In M. Taylor & L. Coia (Eds.), Gender, feminism, and queer theory in the self-study of teacher education practices (pp. 111–123). Rotterdam: Sense.Google Scholar
  10. Bullock, S. M., & Sator, A. (2018). Developing a pedagogy of “making” through collaborative self-study. Studying Teacher Education, 14(1), 56–70.  https://doi.org/10.1080/17425964.2017.1413342.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Butler-Kisber, L. (2008). Collage as inquiry. In J. G. Knowles & A. L. Cole (Eds.), Handbook of arts in qualitative research: Perspectives, methodologies, examples, and issues (pp. 265–276). Thousand Oaks: Sage.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Cardetti, F. A., & Orgnero, M. C. (2013). Improving teaching practice through interdisciplinary dialog. Studying Teacher Education, 9(3), 251–266.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Clandinin, D. J., & Connelly, F. M. (2000). Narrative inquiry: Experience and story in qualitative research. San Francisco: Wiley.Google Scholar
  14. Clift, R. T., & Clift, B. C. (2016). Family scholar lenses on professional opportunities: Gendered transitions, gendered narratives. In D. Garbett & A. Ovens (Eds.), Enacting self-study as methodology for professional inquiry (pp. 305–310). Proceedings of the 11th international conference on self-study of teacher education practices, Herstmonceux. Retrieved from http://www.aera.net/SIG109/Conferences/Past-Castle-Proceedings
  15. Cobb, N. B. (2011). Making sense of students’ fractional representations using critical incidents. In S. Schuck & P. Pereira (Eds.), What counts in teaching mathematics: Adding value to self and content (pp. 93–110). New York: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Coia, L. (2016). Trust in diversity: An autoethnographic self-study. In D. Garbett & A. Ovens (Eds.), Enacting self-study as methodology for professional inquiry (pp. 311–316). Proceedings of the 11th international conference on self-study of teacher education practices, Herstmonceux. Retrieved from http://www.aera.net/SIG109/Conferences/Past-Castle-Proceedings
  17. Coia, L., & Taylor, M. (2009a). Co/autoethnography: Exploring our teaching selves collaboratively. In D. Tidwell, M. Heston, & L. Fitzgerald (Eds.), Research methods for the self-study of practice (pp. 3–16). Rotterdam: Sense.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Coia, L., & Taylor, M. (2009b). Co/autoethnography: Investigating teachers in relation. In C. A. Lassonde, S. Galman, & C. Kosnik (Eds.), Self-study research methodologies for teacher educators (pp. 169–186). Rotterdam: Sense.Google Scholar
  19. Coia, L., & Taylor, M. (2014). A co/autoethnography of feminist teaching: Nomadic jamming into the unpredictable. In M. Taylor & L. Coia (Eds.), Gender, feminism, and queer theory in the self-study of teacher education practices (pp. 157–169). Rotterdam: Sense.Google Scholar
  20. Cole, A., & McIntyre, M. (1998). Reflections on “dance me to an understanding of teaching”. In A. L. Cole & S. Finley (Eds.), Conversations in community (pp. 213–217). Proceedings of the second international conference on self-study of teacher education practices, Herstmonceux. Retrieved from http://www.aera.net/SIG109/Conferences/Past-Castle-Proceedings
  21. Corbin, J., & Strauss, A. (2008). Basics of qualitative research: Techniques and procedures for developing grounded theory (3rd ed.). Thousand Oaks: Sage.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Costa, A. L., & Kallick, B. (1993). Through the lens of a critical friend. Educational Leadership, 51(2), 49–51.Google Scholar
  23. Craig, C. J., Curtis, G., & Kelley, M. (2016). Sustaining self and others in the teaching profession: A group self-study. In D. Garbett & A. Ovens (Eds.), Enacting self-study as methodology for professional inquiry (pp. 133–140). Proceedings of the 11th international conference on self-study of teacher education practices, Herstmonceux. Retrieved from http://www.aera.net/SIG109/Conferences/Past-Castle-Proceedings
  24. Crowe, A. R. (2010). Advancing social studies education through self-study methodology: The power, promise, and use of self-study in social studies education. Dordrecht: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Curtis, G., Reid, D., Kelley, M., Martindell, P. T., & Craig, J. C. (2013). Braided lives: Multiple ways of knowing, flowing in and out of knowledge communities. Studying Teacher Education, 9(3), 175–186.  https://doi.org/10.1080/17425964.2013.808062.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Dalmau, M. C., & Guðjónsdóttir, H. (2017). From the beginning to the future: Professional working theory emerging. In M. C. Dalmau, H. Guðjónsdóttir, & D. Tidwell (Eds.), Taking a fresh look at education: Framing professional learning in education through self-study (pp. 12–148). Rotterdam: Sense.Google Scholar
  27. Dhlula-Moruri, M. N., Kortjass, M., Ndaleni, T., & Pithouse-Morgan, K. (2017). A stove, a flask, and a photograph. In D. Pillay, K. Pithouse-Morgan, & I. Naicker (Eds.), Object medleys: Interpretive possibilities for educational research (pp. 81–97). Rotterdam: Sense.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. East, K., Fitzgerald, L., & Heston, M. (2009). Talking, teaching, and learning: Using dialogue in self-study. In D. Tidwell, M. Heston, & L. Fitzgerald (Eds.), Research methods for the self-study of practice (pp. 55–72). Rotterdam: Sense.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Eisner, E. (2008). Art and knowledge. In J. G. Knowles & A. L. Cole (Eds.), Handbook of arts in qualitative research: Perspectives, methodologies, examples, and issues (pp. 3–12). Thousand Oaks: Sage.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Ellis, C., Adams, T. E., & Bochner, A. P. (2011). Autoethnography: An overview. Forum: Qualitative Social Research, 12(1), Article 10. http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1101108Google Scholar
  31. Finley, S. (2008). Arts-based research. In J. G. Knowles & A. L. Cole (Eds.), Handbook of arts in qualitative research: Perspectives, methodologies, examples, and issues (pp. 71–79). Thousand Oaks: Sage.Google Scholar
  32. Fletcher, T., Ní Chróinín, D., & O’Sullivan, M. (2016). A layered approach to critical friendship as a means to support pedagogical innovation in pre-service teacher education. Studying Teacher Education, 12(2), 302–319.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Florian, L. (2008). Special or inclusive education: Future trends. British Journal of Special Education, 35(4), 202–208.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Fumoleau, R. (1995). Trucklights. In R. Fumoleau (ed.), Here I sit (p. 57). Ottawa: Novalis Publishers. Retrieved from http://www.wondercafe.ca/discussion/religion-and-faith/faith-truck-lights
  35. Gee, J. P. (2000–2001). Identity as an analytic lens for research in education. Review of Research in Education, 25, 99–125.Google Scholar
  36. Glaser, B. G., & Strauss, A. L. (1967). The discovery of grounded theory: Strategies for qualitative research. Piscataway: Transaction.Google Scholar
  37. Glaser, B. G., & Strauss, F. (1999). The discovery of grounded theory: Strategies for qualitative research. New York: Aldine de Gruyter.Google Scholar
  38. Griffiths, M., Windle, J., & Simms, M. (2006). “That’s what I am here for”: Images of working lives of academic and support staff. In D. Tidwell & L. Fitzgerald (Eds.), Self-study and diversity (pp. 227–248). Rotterdam: Sense.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. Griffiths, M., Malcolm, H., & Williamson, Z. (2009). Faces and spaces and doing research. In D. L. Tidwell, M. L. Heston, & L. M. Fitzgerald (Eds.), Research methods for the self-study of practice (pp. 101–118). Dordrecht: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. Guðjónsdóttir, H., & Karlsdóttir, J. (2009). “Látum þúsund blóm blómstra”. [Let a thousand flowers bloom]. Uppeldi og menntun, 18(1), 61–77.Google Scholar
  41. Hamilton, M. L., & Pinnegar, S. (2013). A topography of collaboration: Methodology, identity and community in self-study of practice research. Studying Teacher Education, 9(1), 74–89.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. Heath, C., Hindmarsh, J., & Luff, P. (2010). Video in qualitative research: Analysing social interaction in everyday life. Los Angeles: Sage.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  43. Henderson, B., & Hyun, H. (2017). Teaching for social justice in a new Ed.D. Program: A collaborative self-study to address, “Who can do this work?”. In M. C. Dalmau, H. Guðjónsdóttir, & D. Tidwell (Eds.), Taking a fresh look at education: Framing professional learning in education through self-study (pp. 23–40). Rotterdam: Sense.Google Scholar
  44. Hiralaal, A., Matebane, R., & Pithouse-Morgan, K. (2018). Learning through enacting arts-informed self-study research with critical friends. In J. K. Ritter, M. Lunenberg, K. Pithouse-Morgan, A. P. Samaras, & E. Vanassche (Eds.), Teaching, learning, and enacting of self-study methodology: Unraveling a complex interplay (pp. 295–312). Singapore: Springer Nature.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  45. Hite, B., Meacham, S., Tidwell, D., & Forbes, S. (2017). Self-study of the priming effect in my teaching within reading recovery instruction. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, San Antonio.Google Scholar
  46. Hodson, J. (2016). Learning to dance: Pow Wow, Maori Haka, indiagogy and being an indigenous teacher educator. In J. Kitchen, D. Tidwell, & L. Fitzgerald (Eds.), Self-study and diversity II: Inclusive teacher education for a diverse world (pp. 27–38). Rotterdam: Sense.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  47. Hunter, R., & Garcia, G. (1970). High time. [Recorded by the grateful dead]. In Workingman’s Dead. Burbank: Warner Brothers Records.Google Scholar
  48. Hunter, R., & Garcia, G. (1973). Eyes of the world. [Recorded by the grateful dead]. In Wake of the Flood. San Francisco: Grateful Dead Records.Google Scholar
  49. Hunter, R., & Garcia, G. (1981). Deal. [Recorded by the grateful dead]. In Dead Set. New York: Arista Records.Google Scholar
  50. Johnson, A. G. (1997). The gender knot: Unraveling our patriarchal legacy. Philadelphia: Temple University Press.Google Scholar
  51. Johnston, P. H. (2004). Choice words: How our language affects children’s learning. Portland: Stenhouse Publishers.Google Scholar
  52. Jónsdóttir, S. R., & Gísladóttir, K. R. (2016). Strengthening teacher identify through development of professional working theory. In D. Garbett & A. Ovens (Eds.), Enacting self-study as methodology for professional inquiry (pp. 449–454). Proceedings of the 11th international conference on self-study of teacher education practices, Herstmonceux. Retrieved from http://www.aera.net/SIG109/Conferences/Past-Castle-Proceedings
  53. Jónsson, Ó. P. (2011). Lýðræði, réttlæti og menntun. [Democracy, justice and education]. Reykjavík: Háskólaútgáfan.Google Scholar
  54. Jordan-Daus, K. (2016). Leadership and on finding my way through self-study. In D. Garbett & A. Ovens (Eds.), Enacting self-study as methodology for professional inquiry (pp. 197–205). Proceedings of the 11th international conference on self-study of teacher education practices, Herstmonceux. Retrieved from http://www.aera.net/SIG109/Conferences/Past-Castle-Proceedings
  55. Keightley, E., Pickering, M., & Allett, N. (2012). The self-interview: A new method in social science research. International Journal of Social Research Methodology, 15, 507–521.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  56. Kirk, J. (2005). Starting with the self: Reflexivity in studying women teachers’ lives in development. In C. Mitchell, K. O-Reily-Scanlon, & S. Weber (Eds.), Just who do we think we are? Methodologies for autobiography and self-study in teaching (pp. 231–241). London: Routledge-Falmer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  57. Kitchen, J. (2009). Passages: Improving teacher education through narrative self-study. In D. L. Tidwell, M. L. Heston, & L. M. Fitzgerald (Eds.), Research methods for the self-study of practice (pp. 35–54). Dordrecht: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  58. Kitchen, J. (2016). Inside out: My identity as a queer teacher educator. In J. Kitchen, D. Tidwell, & L. Fitzgerald (Eds.), Self-study and diversity II: Inclusive teacher education for a diverse world (pp. 11–26). Rotterdam: Sense.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  59. Knowles, J. G., & Cole, A. L. (2008). Handbook of the arts in qualitative research: Perspectives, methodologies, examples, and issues. Thousand Oaks: Sage.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  60. Kosminsky, L., Russell, T., Berry, A., & Kane, R. (2008). The boundaries of think-aloud as practiced by teacher educators. In M. L. Heston, D. L. Tidwell, K. K. East, & L. M. Fitzgerald (Eds.), Pathways to change in teacher education: Dialogue, diversity and self-study​ (pp. 197–201). Proceedings for the seventh international conference on self-study of teacher education practices, Herstmonceux. Retrieved from http://www.aera.net/SIG109/Conferences/Past-Castle-Proceedings
  61. Kosnick, C., & Beck, C. (2008). We taught them about literacy but what did they learn? The impact of a preservice teacher education program on the practices of beginning teachers. Studying Teacher Education, 4(2), 115–128.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  62. Kosnick, C., & Beck, C. (2009). Teacher education for literacy teaching: Research at the personal, institutional, and collective levels. In D. L. Tidwell, M. L. Heston, & L. M. Fitzgerald (Eds.), Research methods for the self-study of practice (pp. 213–230). Dordrecht: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  63. Kosnick, C., Cleovoulou, Y., & Fletcher, T. (2009). The use of interviews in self-study research. In C. A. Lassonde, S. Galman, & C. Kosnik (Eds.), Self-study research methodologies for teacher educators (pp. 53–69). Rotterdam: Sense.Google Scholar
  64. Kosnik, C., Beck, C., Freese, A. R., & Samaras, A. P. (Eds.). (2005). Making a difference in teacher education through self-study: Studies of personal, professional, and program renewal. Dordrecht: Springer.Google Scholar
  65. Kvale, S. (1996). InterViews: An introduction to qualitative research interviewing. Thousand Oaks: Sage.Google Scholar
  66. LaBoskey, V. K. (2004). The methodology of self-study and its theoretical underpinnings. In J. J. Loughran, M. L. Hamilton, V. K. LaBoskey, & T. Russell (Eds.), International handbook of self- study of teaching and teacher education practices (pp. 7–39). Dordrecht: Springer.Google Scholar
  67. Lassonde, C. A., Galman, S., & Kosnik, C. (2009). Self-study research methodologies for teacher educators. Rotterdam: Sense.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  68. Lazar, M. M. (2007). Feminist critical discourse analysis: Articulating a feminist discourse praxis. Critical Discourse Studies, 4(2), 141–164.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  69. Leavy, P. (2009). Method meets art: Arts-based research practice. New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  70. Loughran, J. J. (2004). A history and context of self-study of teaching and teacher education practices. In J. J. Loughran, M. L. Hamilton, V. K. LaBoskey, & T. Russell (Eds.), International handbook of self- study of teaching and teacher education practices (pp. 7–39). Dordrecht: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  71. Lunenberg, M., & Samaras, A. (2011). Developing a pedagogy for teaching self-study research: Lessons learned across the Atlantic. Teaching and Teacher Education, 27, 841–850.  https://doi.org/10.1016/jtate.2011.02.008.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  72. Magee, D. (2008). I am the airplane: The use of metaphor as a nodal moment. In M L. Heston, D. L. Tidwell, K. K. East, & L. M. Fitzgerald (Eds.), Pathways to change in teacher education: Dialogue, diversity and self-study (pp. 222–225). Proceedings for the seventh international conference on self-study of teacher education practices, Herstmonceux. Retrieved from http://www.aera.net/SIG109/Conferences/Past-Castle-Proceedings
  73. Magubane, S. E. (2014). Cultivating intrinsic motivation for learning technology: A teacher’s self-study (Unpublished master’s thesis). University of Kwazulu-Natal, South Africa.Google Scholar
  74. Makaiau, A. S., Leng, L., & Fukui, S. (2015). Journaling and self-study in an international research collective. Studying Teacher Education, 11, 64-80.  https://doi.org/10.1080/17425964.2015.1013025.
  75. Meskin, T., Van Der Walt, T., Scott, L., De Beer, C., & Pithouse-Morgan, K. (2017). Shoes, suitcases, stones: Creative engagement with ourselves as artist–researcher–teachers through object inquiry. In D. Pillay, K. Pithouse-Morgan, & I. Naicker (Eds.), Object medleys: Interpretive possibilities for educational research (pp. 175–196). Rotterdam: Sense.Google Scholar
  76. Milner, H. R. (2010). Race, narrative inquiry, and self-study in curriculum and teacher education. In H. R. Milner (Ed.), Culture, curriculum, and identity in education (pp. 181–206). New York: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  77. Mitchell, C. (2017). Objects as subjects. In D. Pillay, K. Pithouse-Morgan, & I. Naicker (Eds.), Object medley interpretive possibilities for educational research (pp. 11–28). Rotterdam: Sense.Google Scholar
  78. Mitchell, C., Weber, S., & Pithouse, K. (2009). Facing the public: Using photography for self-study and social action. In D. L. Tidwell, M. L. Heston, & L. M. Fitzgerald (Eds.), Research methods for the self-study of practice (pp. 119–134). New York: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  79. Murphy, S., McGlynn-Stewart, M., & Ghafouri, F. (2014). Constructing our identities through a writing support group: Bridging from doctoral students to teacher educator researchers. Studying Teacher Education, 10(3), 239–254.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  80. Newberry, M. (2014). Teacher educator identity development of the nontraditional teacher educator. Studying Teacher Education, 10(2), 163–178.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  81. Noddings, N. (2003). Caring: A feminine approach to ethics and moral education (2nd ed.). Berkley: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  82. Nyamupangedengu, E., & Lelliott, A. (2016). Using modelling as a method of teaching a content course to pre- service teachers: Lessons learnt. In D. Garbett & A. Ovens (Eds.), Enacting self-study as methodology for professional inquiry (pp. 85–92). Proceedings of the 11th international conference on self-study of teacher education practices, Herstmonceux. Retrieved from http://www.aera.net/SIG109/Conferences/Past-Castle-Proceedings
  83. Olds, S. (1987). Topography. In S. Olds (Ed.), Gold tell (p. 112). New York: Knopf. Retrieved from http://www.poeticpeople.com/poem/Sharon-Olds/Topography.html
  84. Parker, M., Chroinin, D. N., Coulter, M., Walsh, C., & McFlynn, P. (2016). Snapshots: Teacher educator professional learning shaping teacher educator practices. In D. Garbett & A. Ovens (Eds.), Enacting self-study as methodology for professional inquiry (pp. 189–195). Proceedings of the 11th international conference on self-study of teacher education practices, Herstmonceux. Retrieved from http://www.aera.net/SIG109/Conferences/Past-Castle-Proceedings
  85. Patton, M. (2005). Qualitative research and evaluation methods (3rd ed.). Thousand Oaks: Sage.Google Scholar
  86. Paugh, P., & Robinson, E. (2009). Participatory research as self-study. In C. A. Lassonde, S. Galman, & C. Kosnik (Eds.), Self-study research methodologies for teacher educators (pp. 87–106). Rotterdam: Sense.Google Scholar
  87. Pelias, R. J. (2008). Performative inquiry: Embodiment and its challenges. In J. G. Knowles & A. L. Cole (Eds.), Handbook of arts in qualitative research: Perspectives, methodologies, examples, and issues (pp. 185–193). Thousand Oaks: Sage.Google Scholar
  88. Perra, M. S., & Ruspini, E. (2013). Men who work in ‘nontraditional’ occupations. International Review of Sociology, 23(2), 265–270.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  89. Perrow, M. (2013). “Welcome to the real world”: Navigating the gap between best teaching practices and current reality. Studying Teacher Education, 9(3), 284–297.  https://doi.org/10.1080/17425964.2013.833902.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  90. Philip, T. M. (2013). Articulating the purpose of a social foundations of education course through instructor self-interviews. Studying Teacher Education, 9(2), 203–218.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  91. Pillay, D., Pithouse-Morgan, K., & Naicker, I. (2017). Composing object medleys. In D. Pillay, K. Pithouse-Morgan, & Y. I. Naicker (Eds.), Object medleys: Interpretive possibilities for educational research (pp. 1–10). Rotterdam: Sense.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  92. Pinnegar, S., & Hamilton, M. L. (2009). Self-study of practice as a genre of qualitative research: Theory, methodology, and practice. New York: Springer.Google Scholar
  93. Pithouse-Morgan, K., & Samaras, A. P. (2014). Thinking in space: Learning about dialogue as method from a trans-continental conversation about trans-disciplinary self-study of professional practice. In D. Garbett & A. Ovens (Eds.), Changing practices for changing times: Past, present and future possibilities of self-study research (pp. 167–170). Proceedings of the tenth international conference on self-study of teacher education practices. Herstmonceux. Retrieved from http://www.aera.net/SIG109/Conferences/Past-Castle-Proceedings
  94. Pithouse-Morgan, K., & Samaras, A. P. (2015). Polyvocal professional learning through self-study research. Rotterdam: Sense.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  95. Pithouse-Morgan, K., Muthukrishna, N., Pillay, D., Van Laren, L., Chisanga, T., Meyiwa, T., Naicker, I., Singh, L., & Stuart, J. (2015). Learning about co-flexivity in a transdisciplinary self-study research supervision community. In K. Pithouse-Morgan & A. P. Samaras (Eds.), Polyvocal professional learning through self-study research (pp. 145–171). Rotterdam: Sense.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  96. Pithouse-Morgan, K., Coia, L., Taylor, M., & Samaras, A. P. (2016). Polyvocal research jamming: A quartet enacting methodological inventiveness in self-study. In D. Garbett & A. Ovens (Eds.), Enacting self-study as methodology for professional inquiry (pp. 27–36). Proceedings of the 11th international conference on self-study of teacher education practices, Herstmonceux. Retrieved from http://www.aera.net/SIG109/Conferences/Past-Castle-Proceedings
  97. Pritchard, P., & Mountain, A. (2006). Woodstock to hip hop: Convergent lifeline and the pedagogy of personal quest. In D. Tidwell & L. Fitzgerald (Eds.), Self-study and diversity (pp. 1–18). Rotterdam: Sense.Google Scholar
  98. Ramirez, L., & Allison, V. (2016). Thriving vs. surviving: Our journey to align our teacher education selves in contexts of leadership. In D. Garbett & A. Ovens (Eds.), Enacting self-study as methodology for professional inquiry (pp. 207–212). Proceedings of the 11th international conference on self-study of teacher education practices, Herstmonceux. Retrieved from http://www.aera.net/SIG109/Conferences/Past-Castle-Proceedings
  99. Raphael, J., Hannigan, S., & White, P. (2016). A gallery walk: “Drawing out” understandings of collaborative self-study in teacher education. In D. Garbett & A. Ovens (Eds.), Enacting self-study as methodology for professional inquiry (pp. 109–118). Proceedings of the 11th international conference on self-study of teacher education practices, Herstmonceux. Retrieved from http://www.aera.net/SIG109/Conferences/Past-Castle-Proceedings
  100. Ryan, J., & Rottmann, C. (2007). Educational leadership and policy approaches to critical social justice. Journal of Educational Administration and Foundations, 18(1–2), 9–23.Google Scholar
  101. Samaras, A. P. (2011). Self-study teacher research: Improving your practice through collaborative inquiry. Thousand Oaks: Sage.Google Scholar
  102. Samaras, A. P., & Freese, A. R. (2006). Self-study of teaching practices primer. New York: Peter Lang.Google Scholar
  103. Schuck, S., & Pereira, P. (Eds.). (2011). What counts in teaching mathematics: Adding value to self and content. New York: Springer.Google Scholar
  104. Schuck, S., & Russell, T. (2005). Self-study, critical friendship, and the complexities of teacher education. Studying Teacher Education, 1(2), 107–121.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  105. Sikes Scering, G. E. (1997). Themes of a critical/feminist pedagogy: Teacher education for democracy. Journal of Teacher Education, 48(1), 62–68.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  106. Sowa, P., & Schmidt, C. (2017). Weaving together theory, practice and ethics: UAE and USA graduate students craft their “living theories” using the professional working theory. In M. C. Dalmau, H. Guðjónsdóttir, & D. Tidwell (Eds.), Taking a fresh look at education: Framing professional learning in education through self-study (pp. 169–186). Rotterdam: Sense.Google Scholar
  107. Sowder, M., Leavitt, T., Smith, T. B., & Tanase, M. (2013). When magic becomes art: Educating teachers. Studying Teacher Education, 9(3), 298–310.  https://doi.org/10.1080/17425964.2013.835259.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  108. Spalding, F., & Wilson, A. (2002). Demystifying reflection: A study of pedagogical strategies that encourage reflective journal writing. Teachers College Record, 104, 1393–1421.  https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-9620.00208.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  109. Spencer, L. S., & Spencer, S. M. (1993). Competence at work: Models for superior performance. New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
  110. Stevens, W. (1990). The idea of order at Key West. In W. Stevens (Ed.), Collected poems (pp. 128–129). New York: Vintage Books. Retrieved from http://www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/15749
  111. Stone, R. (1971). Topography. In R. Stone (Ed.), Topography and other poems (p. 116). New York: Harcourt Brace. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aZ2sZpGm3MM
  112. Strom, K. J., & Martin, A. D. (2013). Putting philosophy to work in the classroom: Using rhizomatics to deterritorialize neoliberal thought and practice. Studying Teacher Education, 9(3), 219–235.  https://doi.org/10.1080/17425964.2013.830970.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  113. Taylor, M., & Coia, L. (2006). Revisiting feminist authority through a co/ethnographic lens. In D. Tidwell & L. Fitzgerald (Eds.), Self-study and diversity (pp. 51–70). Rotterdam: Sense.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  114. Taylor, M., & Coia, L. (Eds.). (2014). Gender, feminism, and queer theory in the self-study of teacher education practices. Rotterdam: Sense.Google Scholar
  115. Taylor, M., Klein, E. J., & Abrams, L. (2014). Tensions of reimagining our roles as teacher educators in a third space: Revisiting co/autoethnography through a faculty lens. Studying Teacher Education, 10(1), 3–19.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  116. Tidwell, D., & Manke, M. (2009). Making meaning of practice through visual metaphor. In D. L. Tidwell, M. L. Heston, & L. M. Fitzgerald (Eds.), Research methods for the self-study of practice (pp. 135–153). New York: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  117. Tidwell, D. L., Heston, M. L., & Fitzgerald, L. M. (2009). Introduction. In D. L. Tidwell, M. L. Heston, & L. M. Fitzgerald (Eds.), Research methods for the self-study of practice (pp. xiii–xxii). New York: Springer.Google Scholar
  118. Torrez, C. A. F., & Haniford, L. (2018). Understanding our identities as teacher educators in an era of deprofessionalization. In D. Garbett & A. Ovens (Eds.), Pushing boundaries and crossing borders: Self-study as a means for researching pedagogy (pp. 107–114). Proceedings of the 12th international conference on self-study of teacher education practices, Herstmonceux. Retrieved from http://www.aera.net/SIG109/Conferences/Past-Castle-Proceedings
  119. Trout, M. (2010). Social skills in action: An ethic of care in social studies student teaching supervision. In A. R. Crowe (Ed.), Advancing social studies education through self-study methodology: The power, promise, and use of self-study in social studies education (pp. 119–137). New York: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  120. Wasik, B. A. (2010). What teachers can do to promote preschoolers’ vocabulary development: Strategies from an effective language and literacy professional development coaching model. The Reading Teacher, 63(8), 621–633.  https://doi.org/10.1598/RT.63.8.1.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  121. Weber, S. J. (2008). Visual images in research. In J. G. Knowles & A. L. Cole (Eds.), Handbook of arts in qualitative research: Perspectives, methodologies, examples, and issues (pp. 49–58). Thousand Oaks: Sage.Google Scholar
  122. Weber, S. (2014). Arts-based self-study: Documenting the ripple effect. Perspectives in Education, 32(2), 8–20.Google Scholar
  123. Weber, S. J., & Mitchell, C. (2002). Accessorizing death: A monologue of two voices. Act 2: When the shoe doesn’t fit: Death of a salesman. In C. Kosnik, A, Freese, & A. P. Samaras (Eds.), Making a difference in teacher education through self-study (Vol. 2, pp. 121–124). Proceedings for the fourth international conference on self-study of teacher education practices, Herstmonceux. Retrieved from http://www.aera.net/SIG109/Conferences/Past-Castle-Proceedings
  124. Weiler, K. (Ed.). (2001). Feminist engagements: Reading, resisting, and revisioning male theorists in education and cultural studies. New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  125. Wells, G. (1999). Dialogic inquiry: Toward a sociocultural practice and theory of education. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  126. Whitehead, J. (2010). Creating an educational epistemology in the multi-media narratives of living educational theories and living theory methodologies. Action Researcher in Education, 1(1), 89–109. Retrieved 2 January 2016 from http://www.actionresearch.gr/i1contentsGoogle Scholar
  127. Williams, J., Ritter, J., & Bullock, S. (2012). Understanding the complexity of becoming a teacher educator: Experiences, belonging, and practice within a professional learning community. Studying Teacher Education, 8, 245–260.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  128. Yin, R. K. (2003). Case study research: Design and methods. Thousand Oaks: Sage.Google Scholar
  129. Young, J., & Erickson, L. (2011). Imagining, becoming and being a teacher: How professional history mediates teacher education identity. Studying Teacher Education, 7, 121–129.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of Northern IowaCedar FallsUSA
  2. 2.University of IcelandReykjavíkIceland

Section editors and affiliations

  • Shawn Michael Bullock

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations