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Entry Points for Self-Study

Where to Begin
Living reference work entry
Part of the Springer International Handbooks of Education book series (SIHE)

Abstract

This chapter focuses on contextual issues relevant to the introduction and implementation of self-study with four groups of individuals: teacher candidates, education doctoral students, practicing teacher educators, and higher education practitioners from other fields. This practical chapter identifies possibilities for initial self-studies for each of these groups and explores ways of connecting self-study to one’s own familiar research methodologies.

Keywords

Self-study Qualitative methodologies Professional context Purpose-driven inquiry 

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Duquesne UniversityPittsburghUSA

Section editors and affiliations

  • Shawn Michael Bullock

There are no affiliations available

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