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Resourceful Specialist Support to Enable Inclusive Education

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Introduction

While originally used to combat discrimination faced by learners with disabilities, inclusive education is nowadays seen as a human right that requires education systems to meet all learners’ right to high-quality education by supporting the diversity of their needs so they can all achieve their best (Ebersold et al. 2019). It builds upon a change in the educational culture of teaching and support practices, requiring schools to move away from a “one-size-fits-all” education model toward a tailored approach to education that aims to increase the system’s ability to respond to learners’ diverse needs without the need to categorize and label them. Instead of seeking to fix learners or provide “compensatory” support to learners to fit them into existing arrangements, schools are invited to develop inclusive learning environments that are both universally accessible and adapted or adaptable to each learner’s needs (D’Alessio 2011).

Beyond delivery of individual support,...

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Correspondence to Serge Ebersold .

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Ebersold, S., Kyriazopoulou, M. (2020). Resourceful Specialist Support to Enable Inclusive Education. In: Peters, M. (eds) Encyclopedia of Teacher Education. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-13-1179-6_58-1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-13-1179-6_58-1

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