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Blogging: Connecting Research Communities Online

Reference work entry
Part of the University Development and Administration book series (UDAA)

Abstract

The demand for higher degree research qualifications is growing in response to the requirements of the knowledge economy, greater international competition for and mobility of students, and increased demand for research and researchers. As institutions struggle to keep up with the changing forms and requirements of doctoral education, students and supervisors appear to be turning to alternative spaces for learning and networking, notably in the sphere of social media.

This chapter reports on the establishment of an academic blog on doctoral writing, DoctoralWritingSIG. We draw on notions of connectivism (Downes, Connectivism and connective knowledge: Essays on meaning and learning networks. Stephen Downes Web. Available at http://www.downes.ca/files/Connective_Knowledge-19May2012.pdf. 2012; Siemens and Mattheos, Education 16(1):3–18, 2010) to describe how the blog developed its own community networked across countries and disciplines bringing doctoral students into fruitful exchange with a wide set of doctoral educators.

Keywords

Graduate student writing Online learning communities Social media 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of South AustraliaAdelaideAustralia
  2. 2.University of AucklandAucklandNew Zealand
  3. 3.University of AdelaideAdelaideAustralia

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