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International Labour Organization

  • Maria Victoria Cabrera-Ormaza
Living reference work entry
Part of the International Human Rights book series (IHR)

Abstract

Based on its commitment to social justice, the International Labour Organization (ILO) has been one of the most progressive institutions of the international community. A consolidated system of international labor standards and a vigorous supervisory system have helped the ILO to cement its role as a key player in the development of international human rights, mainly in the field of collective rights, namely trade unions’ rights and indigenous peoples’ rights. This chapter revisits the normative action of the ILO in these fields and shows how, in the performance of its normative function, the ILO has been confronting challenges that have hindered its ability to continue promoting advancements.

Keywords

International Labour Organization ILO Trade union Freedom of association Collective bargaining Indigenous peoples 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of LawUniversidad Espíritu Santo-EcuadorSamborondónEcuador

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