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Where Indigenous Knowledge Lives: Bringing Indigenous Perspectives to Online Learning Environments

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Handbook of Indigenous Education

Abstract

This chapter will highlight some of the challenges and opportunities specific to bringing Indigenous knowledge and perspectives to online learning environments. Drawing on two recent Indigenous education case studies – the author’s experience developing a massive open online course (MOOC) on Indigenous worldviews and codesigning an online course for principals working in First Nations schools across Canada – this chapter will discuss the opportunities and challenges of designing online learning experiences that invite all learners to engage with Indigenous knowledges, worldviews, and pedagogies in culturally appropriate, respectful, and meaningful ways. This research is based on a decolonizing theoretical framework using a critical pedagogical and relational approach to processes of knowledge production, informed by Indigenous research methodologies and epistemological frameworks. Applying an Indigenous ethics derived from Indigenous knowledge protocols in both the course design and the subsequent analysis of data drawn from evaluations of the course, the chapter argues that indigenizing online learning spaces is possible but also fraught with the same challenges of any learning space not of our own making.

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Correspondence to Jean-Paul Restoule .

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Restoule, JP. (2018). Where Indigenous Knowledge Lives: Bringing Indigenous Perspectives to Online Learning Environments. In: McKinley, E., Smith, L. (eds) Handbook of Indigenous Education. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-10-1839-8_62-1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-10-1839-8_62-1

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