Encyclopedia of Medieval Philosophy

Living Edition
| Editors: Henrik Lagerlund

Aristotle, Arabic: Physics

  • Carmela BaffioniEmail author
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-024-1151-5_53-2

Abstract

The Physics deeply influenced Arabic philosophy and science. It was translated into Arabic several times in the ninth and tenth centuries, but only the version by Isḥāq b. Ḥunayn (d. 910) survived. Many Greek commentaries were known as well. The most important center for the study of the Physics was the Baghdad school of Yaḥyā Ibn ‘Adī (d. 973) and his pupil Ibn al-Samḥ (d. 1027). The Physics was studied and commented by the most important Muslim philosophers.

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of Ismaili StudiesLondonUK