Buddhism and Jainism

2017 Edition
| Editors: K. T. S. Sarao, Jeffery D. Long

Vijñānavāda

  • C. D. SebastianEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-024-0852-2_406

Synonyms

Definition

Vijñānavāda literally means the “doctrine of consciousness.” The Vijñānavāda, sometimes called as the “Yogācāra-Vijñānavāda,” is one of the most significant schools of Mahāyāna Buddhism. According to this school, the only existent is consciousness (vijñānamātra, citta-mātra, or vijñapti-mātra).

Introduction

Vijñānavāda literally means the “doctrine of consciousness” (vijñāna + vāda). The other name of this school is the Yogācāra (see  Yogācāra). It is also, at times, called the Yogācāra-Vijñānavāda. It is one of the two major schools of Mahāyāna Buddhism. This school of Buddhist thought flourished in India from the third/fourth century A.D. to twelfth century. According to this school, the only existent is consciousness (vijñāna-mātra, cittamātra, or vijñapti-mātra). In Buddhism, vijñānacorresponds to the resulting activity when the mental and physical organs come...

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Humanities and Social SciencesIndian Institute of Technology BombayMumbaiIndia