Buddhism and Jainism

2017 Edition
| Editors: K. T. S. Sarao, Jeffery D. Long

Ālaya-vijñāna

  • C. D. SebastianEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-024-0852-2_149

Synonyms

Definition

The theory of Ālayavijnāna was elaborated by the Yogācāra school of Mahāyāna Buddhism in India. Ālayavijñāna (“storehouse consciousness”) is a receptacle where the various dispositions of the future determinations are stored. According to the Yogācāra, the “seeds” deposited here provide the connection between the past, present, and future of a subjective personality and its experiences.

Introduction

The word “ālaya” means “abode” or “house,” and it implies, in the theory of ālayavijñāna, a “source” in the sense of “location” (sthāna). The term “vijñāna,” as it is in the entire Buddhist corpus, means “consciousness.” (In Buddhism, vijñāna (see  Vijñāna) corresponds to the resulting activity when the mental and physical organs come into contact with external objects, and the input derived from such contact is associated, recognized, and subsequently acted upon.) Thus, ālayavijñāna...

This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access.

References

  1. 1.
    Williams P (2009) Mahāyāna Buddhism: the doctrinal foundations, 2nd edn. Routledge, London/New York, pp 97, 98Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Prebish CS, Keown D (2006) Introducing Buddhism. Routledge, New York/London, p 109Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Sutton FG (1992) Existence and enlightenment in the Lankāvatāra-sūtra: a study in the ontology and epistemology of the Yogācāra school of Mahāyāna Buddhism. Sri Satguru, Delhi, pp 252–254Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Makransky JJ (1998) Buddhahood embodied: sources of controversy in India and Tibet. Sri Satguru, Delhi, p 205Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Pande GC (1993) Studies in Mahāyāna. Central Institute of Higher Tibetan Studies, Sarnath, Varanasi, pp 126, 127Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Waldron WS (2003) The Buddhist unconscious: The Ālayavijñāna in the context of Indian Buddhist thought. RoutledgeCurzon, London/New York, p 92Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Kalupahana DJ (1992) The principles of Buddhist psychology. Sri Satuguru, Delhi, p 139Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Chatterjee AK (1999) The Yogācāra idealism, New edn. Motilal Banarsidass, Delhi, pp 87–107Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Schmithausen L (2007) Ālayaviñāna: on the origin and the early development of a central concept of Yogācāra philosophy: reprint with Addenda and Corrigenda. International Institute for Buddhist Studies of the International College for Postgraduate Buddhist Studies, TokyoGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Sthiramati (ed) (1925) Triṁśikāvijñaptibhāṣya (1925 ed). In: Levi S (ed) Vijñaptimātratāsiddhi: Deux Traités de Vasubandhu. Librarie Ancienne Honoré Champion, ParisGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Chatterjee AK (1999) The Yogācāra idealism, New edn. Motilal Banarsidass, Delhi, pp 88, 89Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Lusthaus D (2002) Buddhist phenomenology: a philosophical investigation of Yogācāra Buddhism and the Ch’eng Wei-shih lun. RoutledgeCurzon, London, pp 436–437Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Kalupahana DJ (1976) Buddhist philosophy: a historical analysis. University of Hawaii Press, Honolulu, p 143Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Kalupahana DJ (1992) The principles of Buddhist psychology. Sri Satuguru, Delhi, p 137Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Chatterjee AK (1999) The Yogācāra idealism, New edn. Motilal Banarsidass, Delhi, pp 160, 165Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Brown BE (2010) The Buddha nature: a study of the Tathāgatagarbha and Ālayavijñāna. Motilal Banarsidass, Delhi, p 190Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Sebastian CD (2005) Metaphysics and mysticism in Mahāyāna Buddhism: an analytical study of Mahāyānottaratantra Śātram. Sri Satguru, DelhiGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    Waldron WS (2003) The Buddhist unconscious: the Ālayavijñāna in the context of Indian Buddhist thought. RoutledgeCurzon, London/New YorkGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    Chatterjee AK (1999) The Yogācāra idealism, New edn. Motilal Banarsidass, Delhi, pp 91–96Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    Vasubandhu, Katsumi M et al (1989) Three works of Vasubandhu in Sanskrit manuscript: the Trisvabhāvanirdeśa, the Vimśatikā with is Vṛtti, and the Trimśikā with Sthiramtis’ commentary. Centre for East Asian Cultural Studies, TokyoGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Humanities and Social SciencesIndian Institute of Technology BombayMumbaiIndia