Performance-Based Funding, Higher Education

  • Ricardo Biscaia
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-017-9553-1_62-1

Synonyms

Definition

Generically speaking, performance-based funding (PBF) is a method of allocation in which the funding body attributes resources to the funded institutions based (partly or totally) on the performance of the latter. In higher education, national or regional governments are usually the funding body, and Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) are the funded party whose funding result is dependent on their performance. Therefore, some other types of performance incentives are excluded from this definition, such as performance-based grants/loans from governments to students; performance-based measures directed at teachers/researchers, usually coming from within the HEI; and any other incentive measures not drawn by governments.

Performance Indicators and Types of Performance-Based Funding

Attached to the definition of performance-based funding is the problematic of how to measure the...

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.CIPES - Centre for Research in Higher Education PoliciesPortoPortugal
  2. 2.Universidade Portucalense Infante D. HenriquePortoPortugal