Internationalization of Higher Education Research and Careers, Europe

  • Gaële GoastellecEmail author
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-017-9553-1_209-1

Synonyms

General Definition

Internationalization of higher education research and careers is largely associated with academic mobility. In Europe, the share of mobile academics varies strongly depending on the country and concerns different stages of the careers. Being mobile has various effects on the careers according to national contexts but tends to increase the international dimension of the research scope through increasing academic international social capital.

Introduction

Higher Education Institutions’ territories have varied over time, as the transformation of academic circulations and geographies since the Middle-Ages illustrates. In Europe, peregrinatio academica, that is, individuals’ mobility, facilitated by the use of a shared language, as in the fourteenth- and fifteenth-century universities, coexisted with some universities attempt to strengthen the political...

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.OSPS, LACCUSUniversity of LausanneLausanneSwitzerland