MIT Cog

Living reference work entry

Abstract

The Cog Project was an exploration of the idea that human-like intelligence requires human-like interactions with the world [1]. Starting in the summer of 1993, Cog was one of the first humanoid projects in the United States and was a departure from many of the traditional methods promoted by artificial intelligence research at the time. Perhaps the most substantial impact of Cog was an invigorated interest in social and cognitive skills, a legacy that lead to the rapidly developing subfields of social robotics and human-robot interaction that are active today.

Keywords

Cognitive robotics Human-robot interaction Social robotics Series elastic actuators 

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Computer Science & Mechanical Engineering & Materials ScienceYale UniversityNew HavenUSA

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