Encyclopedia of the Philosophy of Law and Social Philosophy

Living Edition
| Editors: Mortimer Sellers, Stephan Kirste

Academic Freedom

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-6730-0_683-1
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Introduction

Academic freedom can plausibly be described as the freedom of university teachers and researchers to produce and make public through scholarly publications, teaching, and other means (extramural speech) any type of material (views, theories, inventions, results, syllabi, etc.) related to their scientific expertise without running the risk of being punished, purged, or silenced for doing so. From this, it follows that the personal beliefs expressed by academics, when they speak in other capacities, i.e., as followers of political parties or football clubs, do not fall within the domain of academic freedom but of freedom of speech in general, although it has to be admitted that, on certain occasions, it is impossible to draw a clear line between what an academic says when she speaks in her official capacity and what she says when she speaks as an ordinary citizen. Moreover, an interesting question about whether academic freedom should be extended to those teaching in primary...

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References

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PhilosophyAristotle University of ThessalonikiThessalonikiGreece

Section editors and affiliations

  • Gülriz Uygur
    • 1
  • Konstantinos Papageorgiou
    • 2
  1. 1.LawAnkara UniversityYenimahalle/AnkaraTurkey
  2. 2.National and Kapodistrian University of AthensAthensGreece