Encyclopedia of Food and Agricultural Ethics

Living Edition
| Editors: David M. Kaplan

Ethics of Dietitians

  • Jacqui Gingras
  • Raquel Duchen
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-6167-4_208-2

Synonyms

Introduction

Registered dietitians are those charged with addressing nutritional health in clinical, public health, and private environments as well as overseeing the production of large-scale food operations in hospitals and other organizations. Given the ethical debates surfacing within contemporary food and nutrition topics, dietitians are often in positions where ethical decisions are required. However, ethics as an area of inquiry within dietetics is limited. Furthermore, there is a paucity of evidence that ethics is taught to dietetic students during their undergraduate education. This situates dietitians as having to address ethical issues while being largely unprepared to do so. The purpose of this essay is to outline ethical debates in dietetics and propose a means to adequately prepare food and nutrition professionals for ethical decision-making frameworks arising in practice....

Keywords

Ethical Issue Nutrition Support Ethical Dilemma Ethical Framework Ethical Violation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of SociologyRyerson UniversityTorontoCanada
  2. 2.Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public HealthColumbia UniversityNew YorkUSA