Water Systems in Bronze and Iron Age Israel

  • Avraham Lynch
  • Helaine Selin
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-3934-5_9473-2

The Near East is located on the edge of the desert. Part of the region is arid/semiarid, and as droughts are a frequent phenomenon, water is a scarce resource even in the Mediterranean climate zone. Water was therefore an important factor determining the situation of settlements in antiquity. Initially, many settlements were located near water sources, mainly springs (rivers are a rare phenomenon in Israel). However, since security was also a major consideration, larger settlements gradually tended to be situated on top of hills. In this conflict of interests, security had, in most cases, the upper hand, and alternative means of obtaining drinking water had to be secured.

Wells

A well is an artificial shaft sunk into the ground all the way to the water table. One of the earliest known wells was uncovered at the submerged Neolithic village of “Atlit Yam.” Later wells are known from Beersheba, Lachish, and Tel Zeror, and it seems as if the practice became widespread from the Iron Age...

Keywords

Water System Underground Tunnel City Wall Secure Source Obtain Drinking Water 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Bar-Ilan UniversityRamat-GanIsrael