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Synonyms

Dyadic satisfaction; Marital satisfaction; Satisfaction with living partner; Spousal satisfaction; Terminology concerning relationship satisfaction

Many terms have been used in the literature to refer to relationship satisfaction, i.e., relationship quality, relationship adjustment, spousal satisfaction, and relationship happiness. Many of these terms have been used interchangeably, and there is still little agreement in the literature on the use of a single term (see Kluwer, 2010). Furthermore, although the majority of studies that focus on marital satisfaction do indeed only incorporate couples that are married, many studies that use the term “marriage” and “marital” do not mean to ignore or exclude unmarried couples.

Definition

Relationship satisfaction is the subjective evaluation of one’s relationship. Relationship satisfaction is not a property of a relationship; it is a subjective experience and opinion. As such, members of the same couple may differ in how satisfied...

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Correspondence to Renske Keizer .

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Keizer, R. (2014). Relationship Satisfaction. In: Michalos, A.C. (eds) Encyclopedia of Quality of Life and Well-Being Research. Springer, Dordrecht. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-0753-5_2455

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