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The Wetland Book pp 2141-2147 | Cite as

Economic Instruments to Respond to the Multiple Values of Wetlands

  • Patrick ten Brink
  • Daniela Russi
Reference work entry

Abstract

Wetlands are some of the most important biodiverse areas in the world, and provide key ecosystem services. A wide range of policy-based instruments need to be increasingly employed to protect them, including regulatory instruments like the designation and management of terrestrial and marine-protected areas; environmental regulation (i.e. regulation of water discharges, regulation of products and spatial planning); property rights, as well as a range of integrated management approaches (Integrated Water Resource Management, Integrated Coastal Zone Management and Maritime Spatial Planning); permit or licence decisions on land use changes, water abstraction and discharges; and restoration targets.

Keywords

Ecosystem services Policy-based instruments Protected areas Spatial planning Property rights Integrated management Permit or license decisions Restoration targets 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute for European Environment Policy (IEEP)BrusselsBelgium
  2. 2.Institute for European Environmental Policy (IEEP)LondonUK

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