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Artificial Production of Snow

Part of the Encyclopedia of Earth Sciences Series book series (EESS)

Synonyms

Artificial snow; Man-made snow; Programmed snow; Snow production; Technical snow

Definition

Artificial snow is produced by rapidly freezing water into ice crystals under high pressure.

Introduction

The artificial production of snow serves two objectives: on the one hand, artificial snow is necessary for laboratory experiments to simulate snow and avalanche processes, on the other hand, it is produced commercially as a surrogate for natural snow to cover ski runs where natural snowfall is missing or uncertain. It is also produced in indoor centers for skiing as well as outdoors in cities for events. It can be produced in virtually all climate zones, even in hot, arid countries like Israel. Dubai hosts the world’s largest indoor ski center. Artificial snow is now produced on nearly all ski runs globally that are affected by large variations in snowfall, that have insufficient natural snowfall or that are effected by climate change. This includes the Alps, Pyrenees, Rockies,...

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Artificial Production of Snow, Figure 1
Artificial Production of Snow, Figure 2
Artificial Production of Snow, Figure 3
Artificial Production of Snow, Figure 4

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Correspondence to Carmen de Jong .

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de Jong, C. (2011). Artificial Production of Snow. In: Singh, V.P., Singh, P., Haritashya, U.K. (eds) Encyclopedia of Snow, Ice and Glaciers. Encyclopedia of Earth Sciences Series. Springer, Dordrecht. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-90-481-2642-2_29

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