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Transitions to Adulthood

An Intergenerational Lens

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Handbuch Kindheits- und Jugendsoziologie

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Abstract

This chapter addresses research on the transition to adulthood in relation to wider family relationships and examines how this transition is shaped historically both by the family support available and the wider economic and political contexts of the period when young people make their transition. First, it sets the transition to adulthood in a contextualist life course perspective. Second, it gives an overview of topics discussed in studies of the transition to adulthood in youth research. Third, it approaches the transition to adulthood from an intergenerational perspective, that is, the ways in which this life course phase of young people is embedded in intergenerational family relations whose meaning and importance change over historical time, vary by gender and social class and may be transformed by experiences such as migration. The chapter covers a wide spectrum of studies (written in English) and outlines the variety of research questions that have been examined in research with different types of methodological, theoretical and empirical orientations, and the types of knowledge gained from these respectively.

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Nilsen, A., Brannen, J., Vogt, K.C. (2015). Transitions to Adulthood. In: Lange, A., Steiner, C., Schutter, S., Reiter, H. (eds) Handbuch Kindheits- und Jugendsoziologie. Springer NachschlageWissen. Springer VS, Wiesbaden. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-658-05676-6_43-1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-658-05676-6_43-1

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