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Increasing Learning Outcomes in Developing Countries by Engaging Students Out of the Classroom Using SMS and Voice Mobile Technology

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Handbook of Mobile Teaching and Learning

Abstract

Engaging students in developing countries through the out-of-classroom use of mobile technologies can increase learning outcomes, positively impacting the economy and the learners in the long term. Teaching and learning capacity in developing countries can be hindered due to limited access to resources. Resource limitations, such as access to electricity, educational materials, technical devices, improper teacher training, and low literacy rates, can limit learning and cause grade retention and student dropout. High repetition and dropout rates further limit resources and lead to overcrowded classrooms making this a never-ending vicious cycle. Basic, GSM-only-enabled mobile devices present an opportunity for engaging students, narrowing the gap in opportunity between the rich and the poor, urban and rural, and bridging literacy barriers by using interactive audio and text content. Full pedagogy of reading, writing, listening, and speaking can offer students a comprehensive learning aid. High mobile penetration and the low barrier to entry, ease of use, and cost effectiveness of mobile devices and technologies in developing countries make them an attractive opportunity for delivering education content. Content can be rapidly created and distributed at contextually relevant times to maximize engagement while actively involving both educators and students in the learning process. A number of mobile educational technologies have been successfully implemented, which demonstrate the benefit of mobile learning to increase student engagement and learning outcomes.

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Correspondence to Danielle Reid .

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Reid, D., Pruijsen, C. (2015). Increasing Learning Outcomes in Developing Countries by Engaging Students Out of the Classroom Using SMS and Voice Mobile Technology. In: Zhang, Y. (eds) Handbook of Mobile Teaching and Learning. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-54146-9_83

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-54146-9_83

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