Encyclopedia of Mineral and Energy Policy

Living Edition
| Editors: Günter Tiess, Tapan Majumder, Peter Cameron

Climate Policy in Russia

  • Yulia YaminevaEmail author
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-40871-7_152-1

Climate change issues are peripheral on policy agenda in Russia. This owes to many factors including abundant mineral resources, a generally marginalized status of environmental and a related fossil fuel lobby, issues, and limited domestic expertise on this topic (Yamineva 2013). In fact, most developments in Russia’s national policy specific to climate change were triggered by the need to conform to the requirements under the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) to which Russia is a party.

Emissions’ Status

According to the International Energy Agency, Russia is the fourth largest emitter of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the world, after the USA, China, and India (International Energy Agency 2013). Despite the apparently significant contribution to the world’s emissions, Russia’s own emissions in fact decreased dramatically – by nearly 40 % – in the 1990s as its economy collapsed following the disintegration of the Soviet Union (Fig. 1). Although greenhouse gas emissions...

Keywords

Energy Efficiency Emission Reduction Kyoto Protocol Joint Implementation International Energy Agency 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of Eastern FinlandJoensuuFinland