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Bio-based Hydrocarbon Polymers

Synonyms

Bio-based polyalkenes; Bio-based polyolefins; Biopolyethylene; Biopolyolefins; Biopolypropylene

Definition

Bio-based hydrocarbon polymers can be defined as polymers that consist of hydrogen and carbon atoms and are derived from natural compounds produced by living organisms, mainly plants. Although most hydrocarbon polymers are saturated polyolefins, such as polyethylene, polypropylene, and poly(α-olefins), this entry discusses those and other “hydrocarbon polymers” consisting mostly of hydrogen and carbon atoms, including polydiene, polystyrene, and related polymers, all of which are artificially produced via polymerization of the corresponding alkenes derived from the naturally occurring compounds used as the raw materials.

Introduction

Polymers based on renewable resources have been growing in importance owing to serious environmental concerns such as dwindling fossil resources and global warming [118]. Bio-based polymers originating from plant-produced compounds are...

Keywords

  • Itaconic Acid
  • Methyl Acrylate
  • Vinyl Monomer
  • Anionic Polymerization
  • Cationic Polymerization

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Correspondence to Masami Kamigaito .

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Kamigaito, M., Satoh, K. (2015). Bio-based Hydrocarbon Polymers. In: Kobayashi, S., Müllen, K. (eds) Encyclopedia of Polymeric Nanomaterials. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-36199-9_385-1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-36199-9_385-1

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