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Complementary and Alternative Medicine and Medical Law

  • Michael Weir
Reference work entry

Abstract

This chapter deals with a selection of legal and ethical issues that apply to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) when provided by orthodox medicine practitioners or CAM practitioners. It defines CAM and outlines the regulatory challenges for CAM practitioners in a number of jurisdictions in relation to statutes which regulate “the practice of medicine.” It deals with the significant legal and ethical concerns that arise for the provision of CAM by orthodox medicine practitioners, normally referred to as “integrative medicine,” in relation to whether they are able to satisfy the standard of care for that profession and the possible professional consequences. The approaches that will minimize the chances of professional breaches by orthodox medicine practitioners will be canvassed. This chapter will also discuss the issue of to what extent (if any) do orthodox medicine practitioners have an obligation to provide information to patients about CAM and the extent to which CAM practitioners need to provide advice to clients about orthodox medicine options.

Keywords

Medical Doctor Medical Practitioner Conventional Medicine Statutory Regulation Orthodox Medicine 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Further Reading

  1. Cohen MH. Beyond complementary medicine: legal and ethical perspectives on health care and human evolution. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press; 2000.Google Scholar
  2. Cohen MH, Ruggie M, Micozzi MS. The practice of integrative medicine: a legal and operational guide. New York: Springer; 2006. p. 30.Google Scholar
  3. Kallmyer JB. A chimera in every sense: standard of care for physicians practicing complementary and alternative medicine. Indiana Health Law Rev. 2005;225:249.Google Scholar
  4. Weir M. Alternative medicine: a new regulatory model. Melbourne: Australian Scholarly; 2005.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of LawBond UniversityQLDAustralia

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