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Legal Issues in Neurology – Observations on American Medical Jurisprudence

  • James C. Johnston
Reference work entry

Abstract

This chapter provides an overview of the common legal issues affecting neurologists in the United States of America (USA). It focuses on tort law, with particular attention to the current malpractice trends. Illustrative management strategies are provided for several recurring claims involving selected neurological conditions. Non-malpractice liability topics are briefly mentioned in the context of overall neurological liability. A discussion of forensic liability centers on the unique risks engendered by the expert witness.

Keywords

Supra Note Diagnostic Error Expert Testimony Expert Witness Pituitary Apoplexy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

Portions of this text are reprinted from James C. Johnston, Neurological malpractice and non-malpractice liability, Neurol Clin 2010; 28(2):441–458, with permission from Elsevier.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Legal Medicine Consultants, LLCSeattleUSA
  2. 2.Legal Medicine Consultants, LLCAucklandNew Zealand

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