Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Case Control Association Study

  • Ahmed E. Hegab
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_868-2

Synonyms

Definition

Case–control association study aims to detect association between one or more genetic markers (usually a polymorphism but also may be a microsatellite) and a trait, which might be a disease (e.g., lung cancer), a quantitative characteristic (e.g., serum level of a cytokine), or a discrete attribute.

Characteristics

Several genetic methods are used for detecting genes responsible for the development of complex human diseases; these are nonparametric linkage analysis, case–control association analysis, and DNA microarray.

Case–control association analysis involves selecting genes that are likely to be associated with the pathogenesis of disease based on our understanding of its pathophysiology. Then genetic polymorphisms in these candidate genes are investigated in a large number of unrelated patients and healthy ethnically matched controls. Significant...

Keywords

Association Study Linkage Analysis Genetic Association Study Control Association Complex Human Disease 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

  1. Hegab AE, Sakamoto T, Sekizawa K (2005) Assessing the validity of genetic association studies. Thorax 60:882–883PubMedPubMedCentralCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Lohmueller KE, Pearce CL, Pike M et al (2003) Meta-analysis of genetic association studies supports a contribution of common variants to susceptibility to common disease. Nat Genet 33:177–182PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Newton-Cheh C, Hirschhorn JN (2005) Genetic association studies of complex traits: design and analysis issues. Mutat Res 573:54–69PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Risch N, Merikangas K (1996) The future of genetic studies of complex human diseases. Science 273:1516–1517PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

See Also

  1. (2012) Allele. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 137. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_6570Google Scholar
  2. (2012) DNA Microarray. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1140. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1683Google Scholar
  3. (2012) Genetic Haplotype. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, pp 1526–1527. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2378Google Scholar
  4. (2012) Genetic Polymorphism. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1528. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2382Google Scholar
  5. (2012) Genotype. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1540. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2396Google Scholar
  6. (2012) Hardy–Weinberg Law. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, pp 1631–1632. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2566Google Scholar
  7. (2012) Linkage. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2043. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3367Google Scholar
  8. (2012) Microsatellite. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2305. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3730Google Scholar
  9. (2012) Polymorphism. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, pp 2954–2955. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4673Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Geriatric and Respiratory MedicineTohoku University HospitalSendaiJapan