Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

AAV

  • Dirk GrimmEmail author
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_8-2

Definition

Adeno-associated viruses (AAV) are small DNA-containing viruses that belong to the family of Parvoviridae. Thus far, 11 serotypes of adeno-associated viruses (AAV-1 to AAV-11) have been cloned from humans and primates, and multiple further isolates were identified in various other species, including birds, bovines, mice, rats, and goats. According to current knowledge, none of these naturally occurring viruses are pathogenic in humans. AAV type 2 (AAV-2) has been studied for over 40 years and is the best characterized AAV isolate, hence its frequent referral as the AAV prototype. All AAV serotypes are currently being developed and evaluated as gene transfer vectors for the human gene therapy of various inherited or acquired diseases, including different types of cancer.

Characteristics

As typical members of the Parvovirus family, AAV are characterized by nonenveloped, icosahedral capsids of about 18–24 nm in diameter. These capsids carry linear single-stranded DNA genomes of...

Keywords

Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Multiple Drug Resistance Human Gene Therapy Suicide Gene Therapy rAAV Vector 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

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See Also

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.BIOQUANT, Cluster of Excellence Cell NetworksUniversity of HeidelbergHeidelbergGermany