Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

CHFR

  • Maria J. Worsham
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_7135-2

Synonyms

Definition

The CHFR (checkpoint with forkhead and RING finger domains) gene, located at 12q24.33, coordinates mitotic prophase by delaying chromosome condensation in response to a mitotic stress.

Characteristics

Chromosomal segregation at mitosis is preceded by a series of steps, including condensation of chromosome and separation of the centrosome, chromosomal alignment, and sister-chromatid separation (Shibata et al. 2002). To ensure fidelity of the replicated genetic material, mitosis is carefully choreographed and monitored by several checkpoint systems (Nigg 2001; Wassmann and Benezra 2001). Missteps in any one of these processes can result in aneuploidy or genetic instability, setting off any number of deleterious events such as unregulated cell growth, leading to neoplastic transformation and tumor progression. A mitotic...

Keywords

Colorectal Adenoma Promoter Hypermethylation Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Primary Colorectal Cancer Mitotic Checkpoint 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

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  4. Shibata Y, Haruki N, Kuwabara Y et al (2002) Chfr expression is downregulated by CpG island hypermethylation in esophageal cancer. Carcinogenesis 23:1695–1699CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. Wassmann K, Benezra R (2001) Mitotic checkpoints: from yeast to cancer. Curr Opin Genet Dev 11:83–90CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar

See Also

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of OtolaryngologyHenry Ford Health SystemDetroitUSA