Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Glucose Metabolism

  • Michael Greene
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_7118-3

Definition

Glucose metabolism is the process by which a simple sugar (monosaccharide) found in many foods is processed and used to produce energy in the form of ATP. Once consumed, glucose is absorbed by the intestines and transported into the blood. Extra glucose is stored in cells as glycogen. When needed, it is hydrolyzed to glucose and released into the blood. Glucose is the most important carbohydrate because it is thought to represent the starting point for more than 80 % of all the phosphorus-containing compounds in proliferating cells.

Characteristics

The name “glucose” comes from the Greek word glukus, meaning “sweet.” The suffix “-ose” denotes a sugar. Glucose is classified as a hexose because it is a monosaccharide containing six carbon atoms. Glucose, like other hexoses, exists primarily in a ring form under physiological conditions and can exist in multiple stereochemical configurations. The stereoisomer of glucose found in nature is D-glucose (a.k.a., dextrose) or...

Keywords

Pentose Phosphate Pathway Citric Acid Cycle Glycogen Phosphorylase Aerobic Glycolysis Fumarate Hydratase 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

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See Also

  1. (2012) ATP. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 302. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_440Google Scholar
  2. (2012) Glucose. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1558. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2430Google Scholar
  3. (2012) Glut1. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1558. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2434Google Scholar
  4. (2012) Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1570. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2448Google Scholar
  5. (2012) Glycolysis. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1570. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2450Google Scholar
  6. (2012) Lactate Dehydrogenase. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, pp 1967–1968. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3260Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Auburn UniversityAuburnUSA