Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

CDCP1

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_7103-10

Synonyms

Definition

CDCP1 is an 836-amino-acid protein that is present in cells as an apparent 140 kDa full-length protein and an 80 kDa fragment. It is overexpressed in some cancers and has been implicated in invasion, metastasis, and tumor progression.

Characteristics

Discovery

The CDCP1 gene was first discovered in 2001 when high levels of mRNA were found in colon cancer cells, and the protein was later identified in three separate instances. SIMA135 was described as an N-glycosylated and tyrosine phosphorylated membrane protein upregulated in metastatic human epidermoid carcinoma cells in 2003. It was later identified as glycoprotein 140, a protein that was highly phosphorylated when cells were cultured in suspension and could be cleaved to an 80 kDa...

Keywords

Renal Cell Carcinoma Focal Adhesion Kinase Renal Cell Carcinoma Cell Phosphorylatable Tyrosine Residue Invadopodia Formation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

  1. Bhatt AS, Erdjument-Bromage H, Tempst P, Craik CS, Moasser MM (2005) Adhesion signaling by a novel mitotic substrate of src kinases. Oncogene 24:5333–5343PubMedCentralCrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Brown TA, Yang TM, Zaitsevskaia T, Xia Y, Dunn CA, Sigle RO, Knudsen B, Carter WG (2004) Adhesion or plasmin regulates tyrosine phosphorylation of a novel membrane glycoprotein p80/gp140/CUB domain-containing protein 1 in epithelia. J Biol Chem 279:14772–14783CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Hooper JD, Zijlstra A, Aimes RT, Liang H, Claassen GF, Tarin D, Testa JE, Quigley JP (2003) Subtractive immunization using highly metastatic human tumor cells identifies SIMA135/CDCP1, a 135 kDa cell surface phosphorylated glycoprotein antigen. Oncogene 22:1783–1794CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Scherl-Mostageer M, Sommergruber W, Abseher R, Hauptmann R, Ambros P, Schweifer N (2001) Identification of a novel gene, CDCP1, overexpressed in human colorectal cancer. Oncogene 20:4402–4408CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. Uekita T, Ryuchi S (2011) Roles of CUB domain-containing protein 1 signaling in cancer invasion and metastasis. Cancer Sci 102:1943–1948CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar

See Also

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics and the UF and Shands Cancer CenterUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA