Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Palladium-Based Anti-Cancer Therapeutics

  • Sharon Prince
  • Selwyn Mapolie
  • Angelique Blanckenberg
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_7085-1

Synonyms

Definition

Palladium-based anticancer drugs are a range of compounds containing the platinum group metal (PGM), palladium, in one of its various forms including metallic palladium (Pd(0)) and palladium ions in either the 2+ or 4+ oxidation states. In addition, radioactive 103Pd has also been used in cancer therapeutics. Examples include its use in fluoroscopy, a medical imaging technique which involves the real-time observation of internal organs, and in brachytherapy which uses medical implants of radioactive palladium-103 seeds.

Characteristics

In this section, the advantages and disadvantages of palladium-based drugs over other metal-based drugs will be considered, specifically focusing on the inherent chemical and physical properties of palladium and how these influence drug–DNA interactions.

Palladium

Palladium is a platinum group metal and as such is very similar to platinum...

Keywords

Platinum Complex Platinum Group Metal Palladium Complex Binuclear Complex Phosphine Ligand 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sharon Prince
    • 1
  • Selwyn Mapolie
    • 2
  • Angelique Blanckenberg
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Human Biology, Health Science Faculty, Division of Cell BiologyUniversity of Cape TownRondeboschSouth Africa
  2. 2.Department of Chemistry and Polymer ScienceStellenbosch UniversityMatielandSouth Africa